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Home News Russian theatre director says ‘no idea’ why German trip allowed

Russian theatre director says ‘no idea’ why German trip allowed

Published on January 14, 2022

Celebrated Russian theatre and film director Kirill Serebrennikov said Friday he had “no idea” why he had been allowed travel to Hamburg after being confined to Moscow for years and vowed to return to Russia.

“Probably I was a good guy, my behaviour was good,” Serebrennikov said at the Thalia Theatre, where he is directing a play called “The Black Monk” based on the story of the same name by Anton Chekhov.

He arrived in Hamburg on Monday will return to Russia on January 22, the opening night of “The Black Monk”.

“We made the application to the official authorities, ‘please allow me to go to Hamburg for work’. And they just gave the permission for this project,” he said.

“I have no idea” why permission was granted in this case having been refused for several other projects, he said.

“I need to be back because I promised,” he added. “I’ll definitely go back because I have to.”

Serebrennikov, known for daring on-stage nudity and profane language and for modern adaptations of Russian classics, had been banned from leaving Russia after running into problems with the authorities.

He was detained in 2017 and placed under house arrest, accused of stealing more than $2 million in state funds allocated to Moscow’s Gogol Centre theatre, where he was artistic director.

The 52-year-old was released from house arrest in April 2019 but told he could not leave the country until 2023.

Supporters saw the case as punishment for his daring work and criticism of authoritarianism and homophobia in an increasingly conservative country.

In June 2020, he was given a three-year suspended sentence and a few months later Moscow authorities ended his eight-year term as head of the Gogol Centre, which he had transformed into a cultural beacon.