Being a black woman abroad

Being a black woman abroad

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“Three things traveling abroad has taught me about being a black woman," according to author, editor and award-winning blogger Carolyn Vines.

For over twenty years I’ve been traveling and living abroad. I’ve been all over the United States down to Mexico and the Caribbean and across the ocean to Europe. I’ve become acquainted with nearly one hundred cities in seventeen countries spread over three continents, each of which, through a slight gesture or a grandiose revelation, gave me insight into what it means to be a black woman in the world.

Firstly, my travels have taught me that America’s futile obsession with race does not define me even though it’s done it’s best to convince me that I’m not relationship material, that I’m loud and otherwise ignorant, i.e. socially inept, and that if I’m financially successful, I’m an anomaly.

In contrast, the people in each of the countries I visited were interested in me because I was a black woman. They listened when I spoke and wanted to know about black culture in America. Bit by bit, with each journey, I expelled all remnants of a racist ideology that, unwittingly, I had internalized.

By the time I moved to the Netherlands, eleven years ago, the slate had been wiped clean enough for me to inscribe my own definition of who I was. Dutch culture does not see blackness first and foremost, nor does it place a stigma on skin colour. Therefore, instead of focusing on how others perceive me because I’m a black woman, I feel empowered to focus on my creative potential as an author, mother and individual.

America’s obsession with race extends to the black community, where it is felt deepest in our negative body image. Nowhere is this felt with greater intensity than among black women and our hair. We’ve managed to politicize something as personal as hair care. Hair continues to divide us. Even now we’re in the middle of a polemic, one side of which tells us that if we chemically process our hair, we’re ashamed of our heritage and have a poor self-image, as though sporting natural locks could somehow obliterate all of our issues, past and present.

In the absence of Dudley products, I’ve been forced to ground my body image in other areas besides the physical. I started paying attention to the fact that people responded to my openness, were drawn to my genuine interest in their culture and were attracted to my growing self-confidence. That, in turn, empowered me to love the body the good Lord gave me – with a couple tweaks here and there! I’m a lovely shade of brown, my body is healthy and my hair is versatile. I’ll change my hairstyle at the toss of a coin depending on what part of my character I want to express that day. Being abroad has taught me that my brown body is just that: a brown body. I get to tell the world exactly what that brown body stands for, not vice versa.

In addition to learning that my hair and that America’s racist ideology do not define me, traveling abroad has taught me that I have a distinctive voice. As in writing, voice is not limited to the words I use but extends to how I get my message across. The fact that I travel speaks volumes to the multi-dimensional identity of black women in general. The way I dress, how I pass along the legacies of the black culture to my children, how I interact with my husband, down to how I try to dance on the cross trainer at my gym listening to Prince, George Clinton and the Doobie Brothers are all extensions of the voice I carry within.

When I turned to words – through blogging and writing my memoir – I connected with other sisters living abroad and tuned into that vibrant community. I learned that we could be, and were, an indispensable support for one another. We shared past hurts, present successes and future dreams. Their voices, expressed through their stories, resonated with and fused into mine, making it stronger, clearer and eloquent.


As I look back over the past twenty years of traveling abroad, I realize that my journeys haven’t been about stepping outside my country as much as venturing internally towards a definition of my black womanhood expressed in my own terms and on my own terms. Those journeys have empowered me to successfully live beyond the limitations of my comfort zone, beyond the limitations of my identity.

 

More about the author

Besides being an author, editor and award-winning blogger, Carolyn Vines is a full-time mother of two bicultural, bilingual daughters. She holds an MA in Latin American literature and has taught in universities in the Netherlands and in the US. She speaks Spanish and Dutch fluently and currently resides with her family in the Netherlands.

Her memoir, black and (A)broad: traveling beyond the limitations of identity is available online at Amazon.com, Amazon.co.uk and Barnes & Noble online

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3 Comments To This Article

  • Ingrid posted:

    on 9th March 2011, 14:02:27 - Reply

    Sorry, I disagree. When I lived in Europe, I was greeted with loud monkey noises, stares and pointing. I lived in Berlin in a very homogeneous neighborhood and spent time as well in Rostock and no one was interested in my identity other than to mock it.

    Of course, I did not attribute those actions to all Berliners or Europeans,
    but I think it's trite to lead others to believe that Europe is completely open to other ethnic populations. I was part of an article for a magazine on the 2006 'No Go' areas for the World Cup and the findings were not pleasant. I was asked to travel to those areas as a black woman to test their safety and at the first stop the police told me 'Best to leave now because after dark people around here use people like you as a punching bag.'

    Please do not generalize your experience to everyone else. I don't think America is so bad. There are limitations, glass ceilings and stereotypes everywhere. If you are loud and ignorant in America, you are exotic and a sexual fantasy in Europe.

    Neither is utopia.
  • Daniel Gaskins posted:

    on 9th March 2011, 13:01:58 - Reply

    Being a African-American (whatever that means) I couldn't have said it better myself. I have been here since 1994 and I have to say you hit the nail on the head. America has a way of instilling some very negative s elf hate images on the black (whatever that means) community.
  • rbragar posted:

    on 9th March 2011, 12:26:15 - Reply

    This article is excellent! A true and intelligent view of travel, self, and cultures.

    Bob, Amsterdam