Video: Dutch news roundup, 2  October 2010

Video: Dutch news roundup, 2 October 2010

2nd October 2010, Comments 0 comments

This week squatting officially becomes illegal in the Netherlands; a commission set up last month to investigate child sex abuse cases in children's homes and foster families has already heard from 100 alleged victims; and a Dutch rock group which performs for farmers celebrates its 35th anniversary.

Ban on squatters

Since the 1960s, squatters have occupied buildings in Amsterdam and other major Dutch cities. Back then, many young people couldn't find affordable housing even though the cities had many unoccupied buildings. So, squatting became an accepted practice. But earlier this year, the Dutch parliament outlawed this practice. As of 1 October, police can go in and use force to remove squatters.

But it may be quite some time before the country is free of squatters. In Amsterdam, the police say they can only devote six days a year to the clean-up effort.

Sexual abuse


Earlier this year, the Catholic church was rocked by a fresh wave of allegations that hundreds of children had been sexually abused while in the church's care. The allegations led the Dutch government to set up a commission to investigate cases in children's homes and foster families from 1945 to the present day. The Samson Commission, which was established last month, has already heard from 100 victims and expects to hear many more testimonies.

squatters have occupied buildings in Amsterdam and other major Dutch cities. Back then, many young people couldn't find affordable housing even though the cities had many unoccupied buildings. So, squatting became an accepted practice. But earlier this year, the Dutch parliament outlawed this practice. As of 1 October, police can go in and use force to remove squatters.

But it may be quite some time before the country is free of squatters. In Amsterdam, the police say they can only devote six days a year to the clean-up effort.

Sexual abuse


Earlier this year, the Catholic church was rocked by a fresh wave of allegations that hundreds of children had been sexually abused while in the church's care. The allegations led the Dutch government to set up a commission to investigate cases in children's homes and foster families from 1945 to the present day. The Samson Commission, which was established last month, has already heard from 100 victims and expects to hear many more testimonies.

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