Two patients die as bacteria hits hospital

4th July 2005, Comments 0 comments

4 July 2005, AMSTERDAM — Two patients have died in the Sint Jansdal hospital in Harderwijk as a result of a combination of their original illness and a strong form of a bacteria that often strikes in hospitals abroad.

4 July 2005

AMSTERDAM — Two patients have died in the Sint Jansdal hospital in Harderwijk as a result of a combination of their original illness and a strong form of a bacteria that often strikes in hospitals abroad.

This is the first time this strain of the intestinal bacteria, clostridium difficile, has appeared in a Dutch hospital.
It infected a total of 29 patients, a hospital spokesperson said. Of these, five remain hospitalised but are in stable condition.

Clostridium difficile associated diarrhoea (CDAD) is known to manifest itself in hospitals. Sint Jansdal said in a statement that 0.1 to 0.2 percent of patients admitted to hospital can develop CDAD.

It mainly strikes patients who have been weakened by another illness and who are on antibiotics.
The condition can be treated relatively easily but CDAD can also spread through a hospital in spore form. The spores can prove resistant to disinfectants and drying out.

The statement issued by Sint Jansdal about the outbreak of CDAD did not refer to the two deaths it has caused. The fatalities were reported by news agency ANP.

The two people who died have not been named nor has any other information been released about them.

The hospital has taken precautionary measures to ensure the bacteria does not spread further.  An investigation has also been launched into what factors if any led to the new form of the bacteria developing in the Netherlands.

A patient died in the St. Jans Gasthuis in the Dutch town of Weert in June as a result of the superbug MRSA.

A spokesperson for the hospital said it was highly unusual for a patient to die from an MRSA infection.

It is unclear where the patient, who was not named, came in contact with the illness.

The spokesperson said the patient was admitted to the hospital with an infection which transpired to be MRSA. While MRSA is big news in British hospitals, it is not believed this case originated outside the Netherlands.

[Copyright Expatica News 2005]

Subject: Dutch news

 

 

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