Spooks to spy on Lonsdale youth

18th January 2006, Comments 0 comments

18 January 2006, AMSTERDAM — The Dutch intelligence service (AIVD) will be on alert for right-wing extremists trying to radicalise native Dutch teens, Interior Minister Johan Remkes said on Wednesday.

18 January 2006

AMSTERDAM — The Dutch intelligence service (AIVD) will be on alert for right-wing extremists trying to radicalise native Dutch teens, Interior Minister Johan Remkes said on Wednesday.

The minister gave this commitment in a letter sent to parliament in response to a supplementary report by the AIVD into the 'Lonsdale youth'.

Groups of white, native Dutch youths who dress in clothes made by Lonsdale have been associated with racist incidents and anti-social behaviour.

Mayor Job Cohen warned on Tuesday of unrest in Amsterdam due to the activities of 'problem youth'. There has been a lot of attention recently on anti-social behaviour by Moroccan teens, but Cohen said many incidents involving native Dutch teens had not made it to the media.

While the majority who wear Lonsdale clothing are no more troublesome than other teenagers, a hardcore have been accused of idolising the Nazis.

It has been suggested these teens wear Lonsdale clothes because the letters NSDA in Lonsdale approximate the initials of the Nationalsozialistiche Deutsche Arbeiter Partei, Hitler's Nazi party. The clothing manufacturer strongly rejects any association.

The AIVD issued its first report into the phenomenon last summer following two incidents. Right-wing youths fought with teenagers of the non-Dutch or allochtoon community in Venray and an Islamic school was targeted by arsonists on two occasions in Uden.

The report last year suggested most Lonsdale youth are not adherents of extreme right-wing philosophies, but xenophobia, nationalism and frustration with a multicultural society are common within the group.

The follow-up report confirmed only a minority of teens who wear Lonsdale clothes are supporters of right-wing extremists or have contact with extreme right-wing groups or parties. But young people may become interested in extreme right-wing politics through friends.

The AIVD said there was no national Lonsdale organisation. Other countries have similar cultures, but none have such a pronounced right-wing image.

Lonsdale youth could pose a potential threat to law and order because the culture's provocative symbols and language leads to conflicts with young people of non-Dutch backgrounds, the AIVD cautioned.

[Copyright Expatica News + ANP 2006]

Subject: Dutch news

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