Special ambulances for the overweight

24th September 2007, Comments 0 comments

24 September 2007, TYNAARLO – Special ambulances for overweight patients will be deployed in the northern part of the country from February next year. They will be used in the area of Assen, Emmen and Leeuwarden, a spokesperson for UMCG Ambulance Services said on Monday. The new ambulances are aimed at preventing ambulance personnel from having to lift dangerously heavy weights. The service says it is the first in the Netherlands to employ the special vehicles.

24 September 2007

TYNAARLO – Special ambulances for overweight patients will be deployed in the northern part of the country from February next year. They will be used in the area of Assen, Emmen and Leeuwarden, a spokesperson for UMCG Ambulance Services said on Monday.
 
The new ambulances are aimed at preventing ambulance personnel from having to lift dangerously heavy weights. The service says it is the first in the Netherlands to employ the special vehicles.

"The height of the stretchers can be adjusted with the push of a button and placed in the ambulance using a platform," explains director Tjerk Hiddes. "At the moment people suffering from extreme obesity are transported using moving vans or vehicles from the fire brigade."

The new vehicles are primarily intended for people heavier than 100 kilos, but will be generally deployed. "The emergency services operators will ask for the patient's weight from now on," Hiddes says. The ambulances themselves are quite heavy, weighing in at 5,000 kg instead of the usual 3,500 kg.

In addition to protecting the personnel, the ambulances are also intended to provide more comfort to the patients. The ambulances will be available from the beginning of 2008 and personnel will be provided with special training. Driving the vehicle requires a type C driving licence because of the vehicle's size and weight.

Three ambulances will be in operation as part of a two-year trial.

[Copyright Expatica News + ANP 2007]

Subject: Dutch news

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