Silent march honours fallen boxer

27th September 2004, Comments 0 comments

27 September 2004 , AMSTERDAM — A large number Amsterdam nightclub bouncers, sporting friends and family have held a silent march in the Dutch capital to pay tribute to champion boxer Nordin ben Salah who was shot on the street and killed last week. And the overriding feeling among participants was that the 32-year-old Salah could not have been killed as a result of a gangland hit, as speculated by investigating police. Without exception, the Moroccan-born boxer was described as a gentle character, newspap

27 September 2004

AMSTERDAM — A large number Amsterdam nightclub bouncers, sporting friends and family have held a silent march in the Dutch capital to pay tribute to champion boxer Nordin ben Salah who was shot on the street and killed last week.
 
And the overriding feeling among participants was that the 32-year-old Salah could not have been killed as a result of a gangland hit, as speculated by investigating police. Without exception, the Moroccan-born boxer was described as a gentle character, newspaper De Volkskrant reported on Monday.

Ben Salah was shot by a person on a motor scooter at about 10pm on Monday 20 September after the boxer caught a train into the city from the sports school where he trained in Purmurend. He died later in hospital.

White T-shirts emblazoned with the boxer's photo and the message "Nordin ben Salah For Ever" were prominent in Saturday's silent march, which ended on the President Kennedylaan, the scene of last week's shooting. The march had started on Museumplein.

As kick boxers openly wept, a family member said "our dear brother" had not strayed off the right path. But police have indicated to the media that Ben Salah was "known to authorities", a euphemism for being involved in crime.

What is on the record though is that Ben Salah had previously been convicted of weapon possession, but marchers said it was a "fairy tale" that he might have been involved in drug dealing or other criminal activities.

Ben Salah was a Dutch national and a world champion kick boxer before switching to normal boxing. He won the WBA super middleweight title last year, but had lost it because injury troubles delayed his title defence. Ben Salah had been scheduled for a comeback title fight in November.

He was enormously popular among young Moroccans. He often volunteered his services to assist them and many joined the silent march on Saturday.

De Volkskrant also noted the amount of women who were involved in the march, including Amsterdam district Zeeburg Alderwoman Fatima Elatik. The hope now is that Ben Salah's killer will be captured soon, one the marchers said.

The boxer's funeral will be held in Amsterdam on Tuesday.

[Copyright Expatica News 2004]

Subject: Dutch news

0 Comments To This Article