RSI recognised as occupational illness

21st December 2004, Comments 0 comments

21 December 2004, AMSTERDAM — Dutch civil law has recognised repetitive strain injuries as an occupational illness with a ruling awarding a female public servant additional benefits.

21 December 2004

AMSTERDAM — Dutch civil law has recognised repetitive strain injuries as an occupational illness with a ruling awarding a female public servant additional benefits.

Trade union confederation FNV announced on Tuesday that the condition, commonly known as RSI, was given official recognition by a judge hearing a case involving a public servant working in the tax office.

"Moreover, civil servants who have occupational illness rights included in their collective bargaining agreement are entitled to an additional benefit payment," the FNV said.

The woman at the centre of the case worked in the tax office in east Brabant. She had to stop work in 1997 due to neck, shoulder and arm complaints.

She was given a benefit payment under the worker disability scheme, known as WAO, on the basis she was 80 to 100 percent unfit for work.

The woman then applied for a regular payment based on the right to a benefit for people with an occupational injury or illness. This right was included in the payment and working conditions agreements agreed for her sector.

Her employers, the tax office, fought against her through the courts. Initially, a court in The Hague sided with the authorities. But an appeal hearing held by the Central Council of Appeal — which handles public service and social security appeals — agreed with her and ruled that RSI was an occupational illness. 

The FNV has described the outcome as a double victory. "But the most important aspect is that RSI is far and wide considered an occupational illness," it said.

[Copyright Expatica News 2004]

Subject: Dutch news

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