Princess Maxima appointed to Council of State

20th October 2004, Comments 0 comments

20 October 2004 , AMSTERDAM — Expat Princess Maxima took up her position on Wednesday in the Council of State, the Dutch government's most important advisory body.

20 October 2004

AMSTERDAM — Expat Princess Maxima took up her position on Wednesday in the Council of State, the Dutch government's most important advisory body.

The Cabinet previously approved the appointment and Princess Maxima's official welcoming into the council represented a climax in the period of introduction the Argentinean-born princess underwent in familiarising herself with all facets of Dutch society.

The council advises the government on legislation proposals, general administrative measures and approval of international treaties. It meets every Wednesday

Princess Maxima said the appointment was a "privilege", adding that she is "pleased to further her knowledge in the coming period of the council's work and its members", Dutch public news service NOS reported.

She thanked the state councillors for the assistance she had been given during her integration process.

Princess Maxima married Dutch Crown Prince Willem-Alexander in Amsterdam in February in 2002. They have a baby daughter, Princess Amalia.

And Queen Beatrix, who is the chairperson of the state's council, said it was an "exceptional pleasure" to initiate her daughter-in-law into the council. The Dutch monarch also said an ancient tradition had been continued with Maxima's appointment.

The German-born Prince Claus — the late husband of Queen Beatrix — and the German-born Prince Bernhard — the husband of the late Queen Juliana, Beatrix's mother — had also in the past been appointed to the Council of State.

The Government Information Service (RVD) said Princess Maxima is not formally a member of the council and does not hold voting rights. She can attend meetings and participate in council discussions.

Prince Willem-Alexander has been an informal member of the council since his 18th birthday, but neither he nor Queen Beatrix have voting rights.

Deputy council chair Herman Tjeenk Willink presented Princess Maxima with a special copy of the Dutch Constitution as a welcoming gift.

"More so than in the past, the Council of State must take into account that the demands a democratic constitutional state lays down cannot be taken for granted any longer," he said.

"More so than in the past, the council must realise the reality in The Hague (the Dutch political capital) does not automatically mirror the social reality."

[Copyright Expatica News 2004]

Subject: Dutch news

0 Comments To This Article