Police: dedicated or just addicted?

28th July 2003, Comments 0 comments

In an amazing tale of the gamekeeper-turned-poacher, crime journalist Peter R De Vries has revealed that senior officers in one of the capital's main police stations regularly used hard drugs and dealt ecstasy and cocaine to colleagues.

In an amazing tale of the gamekeeper-turned-poacher, crime journalist Peter R De Vries has revealed that senior officers in one of the capital's main police stations regularly used hard drugs and dealt ecstasy and cocaine to colleagues.

The television expose by De Vries was based on a leaked report by the police's internal affairs department (BIO).

BIO launched an investigation into the Beursstraat station, next to Amsterdam's stock exchange building, after a detective saw a police brigadier take ecstasy while on a stakeout. Other officers questioned by the BIO described the brigadier as being "addicted".

A total of 12 officers were fired as a result of the investigation and two of the group claimed on the programme that many other police officers use drugs in their free time and while on duty.

They described occasions when colleagues were so stoned on ecstasy while on patrol that they could not even find Amsterdam's main shopping street the Kalverstraat, which is less than two minutes walk from the front door of the Beursstraat police station.

Another officer claimed that a quarter of the station's personnel use hard drugs; sometimes while on duty, sometimes in a nightclub and sometimes in their homes. This hardcore even takes drug holiday breaks, apparently, and rents a holiday home so they can all get smashed on drugs and smash up the place together.

On the one hand these allegations are shocking: the police are the thin blue line between the general public and the murderous drug gangs and addicts who steal to finance their habit. If the police have joined the bad guys, who will protect us from the police?

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In an amazing tale of the gamekeeper-turned-poacher, crime journalist Peter R De Vries has revealed that senior officers in one of the capital's main police stations regularly used hard drugs and dealt ecstasy and cocaine to colleagues.

The television expose by De Vries was based on a leaked report by the police's internal affairs department (BIO).

BIO launched an investigation into the Beursstraat station, next to Amsterdam's stock exchange building, after a detective saw a police brigadier take ecstasy while on a stakeout. Other officers questioned by the BIO described the brigadier as being "addicted".

A total of 12 officers were fired as a result of the investigation and two of the group claimed on the programme that many other police officers use drugs in their free time and while on duty.

They described occasions when colleagues were so stoned on ecstasy while on patrol that they could not even find Amsterdam's main shopping street the Kalverstraat, which is less than two minutes walk from the front door of the Beursstraat police station.

Another officer claimed that a quarter of the station's personnel use hard drugs; sometimes while on duty, sometimes in a nightclub and sometimes in their homes. This hardcore even takes drug holiday breaks, apparently, and rents a holiday home so they can all get smashed on drugs and smash up the place together.

On the one hand these allegations are shocking: the police are the thin blue line between the general public and the murderous drug gangs and addicts who steal to finance their habit. If the police have joined the bad guys, who will protect us from the police?

BIO launched an investigation into the Beursstraat station, next to Amsterdam's stock exchange building, after a detective saw a police brigadier take ecstasy while on a stakeout. Other officers questioned by the BIO described the brigadier as being "addicted".

A total of 12 officers were fired as a result of the investigation and two of the group claimed on the programme that many other police officers use drugs in their free time and while on duty.

They described occasions when colleagues were so stoned on ecstasy while on patrol that they could not even find Amsterdam's main shopping street the Kalverstraat, which is less than two minutes walk from the front door of the Beursstraat police station.

Another officer claimed that a quarter of the station's personnel use hard drugs; sometimes while on duty, sometimes in a nightclub and sometimes in their homes. This hardcore even takes drug holiday breaks, apparently, and rents a holiday home so they can all get smashed on drugs and smash up the place together.

On the one hand these allegations are shocking: the police are the thin blue line between the general public and the murderous drug gangs and addicts who steal to finance their habit. If the police have joined the bad guys, who will protect us from the police?

d>

In an amazing tale of the gamekeeper-turned-poacher, crime journalist Peter R De Vries has revealed that senior officers in one of the capital's main police stations regularly used hard drugs and dealt ecstasy and cocaine to colleagues.

The television expose by De Vries was based on a leaked report by the police's internal affairs department (BIO).

BIO launched an investigation into the Beursstraat station, next to Amsterdam's stock exchange building, after a detective saw a police brigadier take ecstasy while on a stakeout. Other officers questioned by the BIO described the brigadier as being "addicted".

A total of 12 officers were fired as a result of the investigation and two of the group claimed on the programme that many other police officers use drugs in their free time and while on duty.

They described occasions when colleagues were so stoned on ecstasy while on patrol that they could not even find Amsterdam's main shopping street the Kalverstraat, which is less than two minutes walk from the front door of the Beursstraat police station.

Another officer claimed that a quarter of the station's personnel use hard drugs; sometimes while on duty, sometimes in a nightclub and sometimes in their homes. This hardcore even takes drug holiday breaks, apparently, and rents a holiday home so they can all get smashed on drugs and smash up the place together.

On the one hand these allegations are shocking: the police are the thin blue line between the general public and the murderous drug gangs and addicts who steal to finance their habit. If the police have joined the bad guys, who will protect us from the police?

ision expose by De Vries was based on a leaked report by the police's internal affairs department (BIO).

BIO launched an investigation into the Beursstraat station, next to Amsterdam's stock exchange building, after a detective saw a police brigadier take ecstasy while on a stakeout. Other officers questioned by the BIO described the brigadier as being "addicted".

A total of 12 officers were fired as a result of the investigation and two of the group claimed on the programme that many other police officers use drugs in their free time and while on duty.

They described occasions when colleagues were so stoned on ecstasy while on patrol that they could not even find Amsterdam's main shopping street the Kalverstraat, which is less than two minutes walk from the front door of the Beursstraat police station.

Another officer claimed that a quarter of the station's personnel use hard drugs; sometimes while on duty, sometimes in a nightclub and sometimes in their homes. This hardcore even takes drug holiday breaks, apparently, and rents a holiday home so they can all get smashed on drugs and smash up the place together.

On the one hand these allegations are shocking: the police are the thin blue line between the general public and the murderous drug gangs and addicts who steal to finance their habit. If the police have joined the bad guys, who will protect us from the police?

d>

In an amazing tale of the gamekeeper-turned-poacher, crime journalist Peter R De Vries has revealed that senior officers in one of the capital's main police stations regularly used hard drugs and dealt ecstasy and cocaine to colleagues.

The television expose by De Vries was based on a leaked report by the police's internal affairs department (BIO).

BIO launched an investigation into the Beursstraat station, next to Amsterdam's stock exchange building, after a detective saw a police brigadier take ecstasy while on a stakeout. Other officers questioned by the BIO described the brigadier as being "addicted".

A total of 12 officers were fired as a result of the investigation and two of the group claimed on the programme that many other police officers use drugs in their free time and while on duty.

They described occasions when colleagues were so stoned on ecstasy while on patrol that they could not even find Amsterdam's main shopping street the Kalverstraat, which is less than two minutes walk from the front door of the Beursstraat police station.

Another officer claimed that a quarter of the station's personnel use hard drugs; sometimes while on duty, sometimes in a nightclub and sometimes in their homes. This hardcore even takes drug holiday breaks, apparently, and rents a holiday home so they can all get smashed on drugs and smash up the place together.

On the one hand these allegations are shocking: the police are the thin blue line between the general public and the murderous drug gangs and addicts who steal to finance their habit. If the police have joined the bad guys, who will protect us from the police?

BIO launched an investigation into the Beursstraat station, next to Amsterdam's stock exchange building, after a detective saw a police brigadier take ecstasy while on a stakeout. Other officers questioned by the BIO described the brigadier as being "addicted".

A total of 12 officers were fired as a result of the investigation and two of the group claimed on the programme that many other police officers use drugs in their free time and while on duty.

They described occasions when colleagues were so stoned on ecstasy while on patrol that they could not even find Amsterdam's main shopping street the Kalverstraat, which is less than two minutes walk from the front door of the Beursstraat police station.

Another officer claimed that a quarter of the station's personnel use hard drugs; sometimes while on duty, sometimes in a nightclub and sometimes in their homes. This hardcore even takes drug holiday breaks, apparently, and rents a holiday home so they can all get smashed on drugs and smash up the place together.

On the one hand these allegations are shocking: the police are the thin blue line between the general public and the murderous drug gangs and addicts who steal to finance their habit. If the police have joined the bad guys, who will protect us from the police?

d>

In an amazing tale of the gamekeeper-turned-poacher, crime journalist Peter R De Vries has revealed that senior officers in one of the capital's main police stations regularly used hard drugs and dealt ecstasy and cocaine to colleagues.

The television expose by De Vries was based on a leaked report by the police's internal affairs department (BIO).

BIO launched an investigation into the Beursstraat station, next to Amsterdam's stock exchange building, after a detective saw a police brigadier take ecstasy while on a stakeout. Other officers questioned by the BIO described the brigadier as being "addicted".

A total of 12 officers were fired as a result of the investigation and two of the group claimed on the programme that many other police officers use drugs in their free time and while on duty.

They described occasions when colleagues were so stoned on ecstasy while on patrol that they could not even find Amsterdam's main shopping street the Kalverstraat, which is less than two minutes walk from the front door of the Beursstraat police station.

Another officer claimed that a quarter of the station's personnel use hard drugs; sometimes while on duty, sometimes in a nightclub and sometimes in their homes. This hardcore even takes drug holiday breaks, apparently, and rents a holiday home so they can all get smashed on drugs and smash up the place together.

On the one hand these allegations are shocking: the police are the thin blue line between the general public and the murderous drug gangs and addicts who steal to finance their habit. If the police have joined the bad guys, who will protect us from the police?

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