Plan to lift ban on North Sea windmills

14th September 2004, Comments 0 comments

14 September 2004 , AMSTERDAM — Dutch Economic Affairs Minister Laurens Jan Brinkhorst plans to lift the ban on windmill energy parks in the North Sea by the end of the year.

14 September 2004

AMSTERDAM — Dutch Economic Affairs Minister Laurens Jan Brinkhorst plans to lift the ban on windmill energy parks in the North Sea by the end of the year.

Speaking at a sustainable energy conference in Amsterdam on Monday, the Democrat D66 minister said his plan was designed to give a fresh impetus to the renewable energy sector.

Together with Transport and Public Works State Secretary Melanie van Schultz, Brinkhorst will soon submit a proposal to the Cabinet calling for the lifting of the ban on windmill parks in the North Sea.

Permits have recently been issued for the construction of two windmill parks in the North Sea, one off the coast at Egmond aan Zee and another at IJmuiden. The windmill parks still have to be built.

A moratorium has been imposed on new projects in anticipation of new legislation, newspaper De Telegraaf reported.

But Brinkhorst believes that the new legislation will be delayed for too long and intends to lift the temporary ban so that new permit applications can be processed again.

The government's target for some time states that by 2020, windmill parks in the North Sea must be able to generate 6,000 megawatt of electricity. This is enough to supply power to 6 million households all year round.
 
The two parks at Egmond and IJmuiden will be able to generate a combined 220 megawatts and land-based windmill parks presently generate 1,000 megawatts. The land-based supply must be increased to 1,500 megawatts within the next few years.

A spokesman from the Economic Affairs Ministry said consortiums have already expressed interest in building more windmill parks in the North Sea. And the branch organisation, EnergieNed, has reacted positively to Brinkhorst's proposal.

A spokesman from environment lobby group Greenpeace was also "very happy" with the plan, but lamented that it had taken so long for progress to be made.

The North Sea Foundation said Minister Brinkhorst was sowing confusion by creating the idea that everyone could apply for a permit, despite the fact preconditions relating to the protection of habitat and the environment are still not clear.

[Copyright Expatica News 2004]

Subject: Dutch news

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