Parliament names hall after Fortuyn

19th November 2003, Comments 0 comments

19 November 2003 AMSTERDAM — A hall in a new wing of the Lower House of Parliament will be named after deceased anti-immigration politician Pim Fortuyn, who was shot and killed in Hilversum in May 2002.Fortuyn was assassinated before he could serve as an MP, but the parliament board has made an exception to the rule in allowing the hall to be named in honour of him. Generally, only those who served as an MP can have a hall named after them.The Fortuyn hall will probably be located in the new wing of the Lo

19 November 2003

AMSTERDAM — A hall in a new wing of the Lower House of Parliament will be named after deceased anti-immigration politician Pim Fortuyn, who was shot and killed in Hilversum in May 2002.

Fortuyn was assassinated before he could serve as an MP, but the parliament board has made an exception to the rule in allowing the hall to be named in honour of him. Generally, only those who served as an MP can have a hall named after them.

The Fortuyn hall will probably be located in the new wing of the Lower House across from the Plein. Besides housing public servants, the LPF will also move into the new wing away from its present cramped offices. The wing will be opened next Spring.

A parliament commission rejected a request last week to from the populist LPF — which Fortuyn set up before his death — to name a hall after the maverick politician, a Radio Netherlands report said. But the parliament board overturned the decision on Wednesday and will officially make its ruling next week.

Pim Fortuyn was made famous last year by his anti-immigration stance and comments that the "Netherlands is full". He also won widespread support for his charismatic attacks against the older, more established political parties.

He was shot and killed by animal rights activist Volkert van der Graaf — who was sentenced earlier this year to an 18-year jail term — in the lead up to the 15 May 2002 election. But the Dutch public voted on mass for his LPF, propelling the debut party into a coalition government with the Christian Democrat CDA and Liberal VVD.

But internal LPF conflicts brought down the government just 87 days after it came to office. New elections were held in January and the right-wing LPF did well to hold eight seats, settling into a more stable role in the parliamentary opposition benches.
 
[Copyright Expatica News 2003]

Subject: Dutch news

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