"No support for new redundancy law"

13th September 2007, Comments 0 comments

13 September 2007 AMSTERDAM – A majority of the Dutch opposes the government's plans to change redundancy legislation. This has emerged from a survey that TNS NIPO carried out at the request of trade union confederation FNV.

13 September 2007
 
AMSTERDAM – A majority of the Dutch opposes the government's plans to change redundancy legislation. This has emerged from a survey that TNS NIPO carried out at the request of trade union confederation FNV.

When asked outright, 55 percent of the Dutch say they are opposed to Social Affairs Minister Piet Hein Donner's plan to make it easier to dismiss employees. That number increases to 61 percent when the respondents are given the arguments being presented on both sides: those given by the trade unions, who oppose the plans, on the one hand, and those given by the employers' organisations, which support the plans, on the other. It is remarkable that even among employers the number of opponents increases, from 13 to 25 percent, when these arguments are presented to them.

75 percent of the more than 1,000 people asked say the most significant effect will be that a permanent contract would diminish in value as a result of the plan. One in five is reasonably up to date on the substance of the plans.

75 percent of PvdA voters are opposed to relaxing dismissal legislation. CDA and ChristenUnie voters are more divided. 52 percent of Christian Democrat voters are opposed to the plans; 42 percent are in favour. These figures for the ChristenUnie are 47 percent and 44 percent, respectively.

[Copyright Expatica News + ANP 2007]

Subject: Dutch news

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