No support for PVV motion in parliament

7th September 2007, Comments 0 comments

7 September 2007 , THE HAGUE – During the parliamentary debate on Islamic radicalism last night none of the political parties supported the motion of no-confidence submitted by the Party for Freedom (PVV) against Minister of Housing, Living and Integration Ella Vogelaar. PVV faction leader Geert Wilders, who had submitted the motion, cannot live with Vogelaar’s comment in an interview two months ago in Trouw saying that: in due course the Netherlands will become a country with a ‘Jewish-Christian-Islamic t

7 September 2007
 

THE HAGUE – During the parliamentary debate on Islamic radicalism last night none of the political parties supported the motion of no-confidence submitted by the Party for Freedom (PVV) against Minister of Housing, Living and Integration Ella Vogelaar.
 
PVV faction leader Geert Wilders, who had submitted the motion, cannot live with Vogelaar’s comment in an interview two months ago in Trouw saying that: in due course the Netherlands will become a country with a ‘Jewish-Christian-Islamic tradition’.

The Liberal party VVD had seriously considered supporting the motion but after internal consultations decided against it.

Prior to the motion Wilders had called the minister ‘raving mad’. Vogelaar did not respond to the provocation but found Wilders’ comment ‘somewhat rude’. The PvdA minister ‘did not feel the need to retract her comments’ that the Islamic culture is becoming deeply rooted in the Dutch society.

Vogelaar feels ‘no need at all to put a halt to Islamisation’. Wilders feels that with her remarks she has betrayed the Dutch culture.

VVD spokesperson Halbe Zijlstra felt that the minister’s remark showed  ‘the kind of cultural activism that is unprecedented’. He said that he expected a minister to fully support our civil liberties. In the end the VVD did not support the motion as the party felt that the minister needed to be reprimanded on her actions and policy.

D66 faction leader Alexander Pechtold wants to hold a discussion in parliament on how members of the Lower House should interact in a civil manner.

On Thursday parliament debated the report on Islamic activism presented by the Scientific Council for Government Policy (WRR).Wilders seized this opportunity to call again for the ban on the Koran in the Netherlands. He referred to the book that is holy to Muslims as an extremist book inciting hatred and killing.

Prime Minister Jan Peter Balkenende called on the parliament to show ‘mutual respect’. The government stands firm in protecting values such as freedom of expression and freedom of religion but will clamp down on violence, inciting hatred and threatening behaviour, Balkenende said. He felt that we should not ignore people because of their religion.
The VVD wants to revoke the Dutch nationality of imams rejecting the constitution. If hate-inciting Islamic preachers do not have a Dutch passport they can be expelled, said Zijlstra of opposition party VVD.

The VVD also wants mosques led by radical imams to be closed. This is already possible within the law, according to Minister of Justice Ernst Hirsch Ballin. To curb radicalisation Hirsch Ballin is considering stipulating a requirement on how Islamic communities should use their mosques. The minister is also preparing a bill that, as an additional punishment, will ban religious leaders inciting hatred from practicing their profession.

The VVD insists that by 2010 when enough imams have been educated in the Netherlands imams from outside the European Union should no longer be allowed.
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Coalition party PvdA has called on the government to completely review its consultations with the Dutch Muslim community. The current representatives do not reflect the different ideas held by Dutch Muslims. Vogelaar indicated that she is willing to engage in talks with new people in the Dutch Muslim community

[Copyright Expatica News + ANP 2007]

Subject: Dutch news

 

 


 

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