Netherlands faces shortage of top expats

4th May 2005, Comments 0 comments

4 May 2005, AMSTERDAM — The Dutch government is battling to lure skilled expats to the country amid reports the Netherlands is expecting a shortage of 120,000 skilled expats in the coming period.

4 May 2005

AMSTERDAM — The Dutch government is battling to lure skilled expats to the country amid reports the Netherlands is expecting a shortage of 120,000 skilled expats in the coming period.

This shortage comes despite the fact 400 people have availed of a new entry procedure introduced last October by the government for highly-skilled expats.

In addition, 450 companies and education institutes have registered with the Immigration and Naturalisation Service (IND) to make use of the new system, IND spokesman Martin Bruinsma said on Wednesday.

Under the new system, expats who earn more than EUR 45,000 gross per year no longer need a work permit and are granted a residence permit for five years.

The income criterion does not apply to doctoral students or to postgraduates and university teachers under 30 years of age. Knowledge migrants under 30 years of age must earn at least EUR 32,600.

Meanwhile, presenting its annual report on Wednesday, the IND said asylum seekers won 21 percent of appeals last year compared with 13 percent in 2003.

The higher number of appeal losses breaks a recent trend. The IND lost 28 percent of appeals in 2001 and lowered that 16 percent in 2002.

However, an IND spokesman said the increase in losses last year does not signify the quality of IND decisions has declined.

If an asylum seeker wins an appeal, there might have been a change in government policy in the meantime or new facts might have come to light.

For example, Somali women are now being allowed to stay in the Netherlands if they are faced with female circumcision in the East African nation.

In total, 9,800 requests for asylum were lodged with the IND last year. Almost one-third of these were a second or successive request for asylum.

There was a 15 percent decline in regular entry requests; from 65,000 in 2003 to 55,000 last year.

Three-quarters of these involves family unification or formation immigration requests. One-third of requests are lodged from Turkey and Morocco.

The number of regular requests that the IND processed increased strongly from almost 13,000 in 2003 to 120,000 last year. This was due to a transfer of tasks from the foreign police to the IND.

There was a slight increase in the number of complaints about the IND to 8,500, about 100 more than 2003. Most of the complaints relate to delays in which residence documents are sent too late.

The delays were blamed on technical problems resulting from the transfer of foreign police duties.

IND director Peter Veld told newspaper 'De Volkskrant' that complaints can never be totally eliminated. But he said last year's problems will dissipate, due in part to the modernisation carried out, such as the skilled expat entry procedure.

[Copyright Expatica News + ANP 2005]

Subject: Dutch news

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