Morning newspapers – 6 November 2007

6th November 2007, Comments 0 comments

Cars towing caravans or other trailers will have a higher speed limit in future, the AD reports. Transport Minister Eurlings wants to increase the speed limit from 80 to 90 km per hour. It could be some time before this change is implemented however because the system used by police to handle speed tickets automatically must be adapted.

Cars towing caravans or other trailers will have a higher speed limit in future, the AD reports. Transport Minister Eurlings wants to increase the speed limit from 80 to 90 km per hour. It could be some time before this change is implemented however because the system used by police to handle speed tickets automatically must be adapted.

Other car news in Trouw: Amsterdam wants to refuse to allow cars that cause a lot of pollution into the city. The municipality wants to designate "environmental zones" where cars that cause a great deal of pollution are banned. The five percent of cars that cause the most pollution account for 40 percent of the air pollution in the city, says alderwoman Marijke Vos. These are primarily diesel cars without a soot filter and old petrol-fuelled vehicles.

"Drink sector starts campaign against alcohol," is the headline in the Telegraaf. Drinks manufacturers, supermarkets and the catering industry are urging a tax hike of one percent on alcoholic drinks, the paper reports. The initiative from organisations including the Central Agency for Food Products (CBL) and the Foundation for Responsible Alcohol Use (Stiva) is a reaction to plans from the cabinet to discourage alcohol consumption among youth.

Minors of ethnic background are discriminated against by public prosecutors, who tend to refer them to juvenile court more often than native youths. The Volkskrant reports this. A survey by sociologist Don Weenink indicates that children of ethnic minority background are referred to juvenile court almost twice as often as native youths. Social workers charged with assessing whether a case should go to court often cannot handle suspects of minority background in interviews and therefore see them as a risk.

About 800,000 Dutch can expect the money they are due by the tax authority in December, the AD writes. People who had too much tax withheld are normally supposed to have it refunded before the summer, but problems in the exchange of information between the tax authority and the benefits administration UWV led to delays. It is now being paid out with interest.

[Copyright Expatica News + ANP 2007]

Subject: Dutch news

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