Morning newspapers – 3 October 2007

3rd October 2007, Comments 0 comments

Ayaan Hirsi Ali will soon be returning to the US. The Nederlands Dagblad reports she wants to leave for America on Friday because she plans to hold a lecture there this weekend. It is still unclear however who will pay for her security during the visit. The government decided this week to stop footing the bill for protection outside the Netherlands. Her employer, the American Enterprise Institute, is wealthy enough to pay her security, the paper reports. It reportedly has reserves of USD 70 million.

Ayaan Hirsi Ali will soon be returning to the US. The Nederlands Dagblad reports she wants to leave for America on Friday because she plans to hold a lecture there this weekend. It is still unclear however who will pay for her security during the visit. The government decided this week to stop footing the bill for protection outside the Netherlands. Her employer, the American Enterprise Institute, is wealthy enough to pay her security, the paper reports. It reportedly has reserves of USD 70 million.

The AD reports that a majority in Parliament does not think the government should continue to pay for Hirsi Ali's security if she wants to live abroad permanently. "It cannot be the case that the taxes paid by hard working Dutch are spent on that," says VVD MP Laetitia Griffith.

Single people are protesting the single occupancy surcharge on hotel rooms. The AD reports that the Centre for the Individual & Society is drawing up a blacklist of organisations that charge this extra fee. A case will also be brought to court to test whether the surcharge might be in violation of the law. The room surcharge is number one on the top 10 of annoyances mentioned by single travellers, according to a survey by singles magazine M/V Life.

De Telegraaf reports that leaflets included with medicines are incomprehensible to at least 60 percent of the population. The leaflets are written with a university-level vocabulary and are therefore difficult for many people to follow, according to a survey by BureauTaal. The research bureau looked at the leaflets accompanying the most common medicines. Industry organisation Nefarma says the outcome of the survey is "shocking."

The book 'Woensdag gehaktdag' (Wednesday Mince Day) from Richard Klinkhamer will not be on sale at AKO, but will be available at other booksellers, the Volkskrant reports. In the book Klinkhamer describes how he killed his wife. Unlike AKO, competitor Bruna will be selling the book. "We cannot decide for the reader if the story goes too far. You're not forced to buy the book," says Bruna director Hans Gelauff. The book is also for sale at shops like Selexyz and Donner.

[Copyright Expatica News + ANP 2007]

Subject: Dutch news

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