Morning newspapers – 28 August 2007

28th August 2007, Comments 0 comments

Reporters from the AD and the Telegraaf travelled to the Frisian village of Sint Annaparochie, the hometown of Martijn Rosier, the Dutch soldier who was killed in Afghanistan recently. "It is as if there is a black cloud hanging over the village," the AD described it, in the words of one of the Rosier family's neighbours. "It brings a war that seems so far away suddenly close by."

Reporters from the AD and the Telegraaf travelled to the Frisian village of Sint Annaparochie, the hometown of Martijn Rosier, the Dutch soldier who was killed in Afghanistan recently. "It is as if there is a black cloud hanging over the village," the AD described it, in the words of one of the Rosier family's neighbours. "It brings a war that seems so far away suddenly close by."

The Volkskrant focused primarily on the government's plan to continue the mission in Uruzgan. The nrc.next ran the headline "Uruzgan at its most beautiful," referring to the lesson material about the military mission that is being provided to schools. School children are not being taught that the mission is controversial.

Petrol stations want financial compensation from the government for lost income because of traffic jams, the Telegraaf reports. The paper is covering the "Let NL drive!" campaign. Motorists who end up in traffic skip a stop at a petrol station to make up for lost time. Not only are the stations selling less petrol, they are also selling less snacks and tobacco.

Getting rid of the car is not an option for most people, De Telegraaf writes. "If you can't decide yourself where you're going, is life even worth living?" is how psychologist Jeffrey Wijnberg expresses people's need for a car. The car has also become a status symbol, which makes it difficult for some to sell their car if they're facing financial difficulties. "That empty parking place is very conspicuous."

Plans are taking shape for a national relief centre for victims of human trafficking. These victims include prostitutes and horticulture workers, Nederlands Dagblad reports. The victims will be provided legal help and counselling at the centre. The centre will also help track down perpetrators of human trafficking. The location for the centre has not yet been announced.

How can you spot a student that is becoming more radical? Trouw asks this question in response to the action plan to combat radicalisation announced by Minister Ter Horst on Monday. Teachers should pay attention to comments that students make in class in lessons like social studies, say school directors. Teachers should also pay attention to how students dress: a Lonsdale jacket, for instance, or Islamic clothing. "But clothing is a difficult recognition point, because teachers don't always know the significance of it," says director Martin van den Berg of the Christiaan Huygens College in Eindhoven.

[Copyright Expatica News + ANP 2007]

Subject: Dutch news

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