Morning newspapers – 26 September 2007

26th September 2007, Comments 0 comments

In addition to fuel, tobacco and alcohol, meat will also become more expensive, the Telegraaf writes. That is, if it is up to the Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis (CPB) and the Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency (MNP). The two advisory bodies to the government have considered a citizen initiative to compensate for the enormous CO2 emissions released by the production of meat. The MNP says that meat production is extremely harmful to the environment, partly because of livestock transport and the

In addition to fuel, tobacco and alcohol, meat will also become more expensive, the Telegraaf writes. That is, if it is up to the Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis (CPB) and the Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency (MNP). The two advisory bodies to the government have considered a citizen initiative to compensate for the enormous CO2 emissions released by the production of meat. The MNP says that meat production is extremely harmful to the environment, partly because of livestock transport and the clearing of rainforests. If the cabinet introduces an environmental tax on meat, consumers will have to pay about 10 cents extra for a steak or chop.

The climate occupies a prominent place on the front page of Trouw as well. The newspaper discusses the Sustainability Monitor 2007. The study, commissioned by the government, indicates that the Dutch are showing more concern for the environment and the climate. Terrorism is no longer their "number one worry." About half of the Dutch say they make an effort to live more sustainably, though few are willing to stop using their cars. Remarkably enough only two respondents said they were concerned about the economy.

The Volkskrant cranks up the heat on PvdA faction leader Jacques Tichelaar in an interview about his party's "no" to a referendum on the new European treaty. The newspaper asks Tichelaar why he has done an about face on the topic since last summer when he said he supported a referendum. He answered that he has made no such turnaround, since what is up for discussion now is not a constitutional treaty. Tichelaar says all the requests of the PvdA, and by extension those of the voters, were satisfied.

A leader of a very different calibre, Iran's president Ahmedinejad, comes under fire in De Pers. The newspaper has drawn up an analysis of Ahmedinejad's visit to New York over the past few days. De Pers says he has accomplished nothing. A UN conference on climate, to which he was invited, ended up focusing on Iran's nuclear ambitions instead. The controversial leader reportedly made things more difficult for himself in the US. He would have been wise not to use the word uranium and spared himself a great deal of trouble had he not announced his wish to lay a wreath at Ground Zero.

[Copyright Expatica News + ANP 2007]

Subject: Dutch news

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