Morning newspapers – 26 October 2007

26th October 2007, Comments 0 comments

Dutch police instructors are training a special arrest team in Surinam which will probably be sent in for the arrest of Desi Bouterse. This is taking place in the utmost secrecy, the Telegraaf writes. Bouterse must stand trial next month for his involvement in the December murders. The Surinamese "A-team" is being trained by the Dutch in new techniques and procedures for arresting suspects who are armed and dangerous.

Dutch police instructors are training a special arrest team in Surinam which will probably be sent in for the arrest of Desi Bouterse. This is taking place in the utmost secrecy, the Telegraaf writes. Bouterse must stand trial next month for his involvement in the December murders. The Surinamese "A-team" is being trained by the Dutch in new techniques and procedures for arresting suspects who are armed and dangerous.

Some disadvantaged neighbourhoods in the Netherlands are on the brink of breaking into riots like those in Paris if no changes are made to how problems in these areas are addressed. Sociologist Iliass El'Hadioui says this in the AD in response to the car fires in the Amsterdam district of Slotervaart. The young people causing unrest there are copying the behaviour of youth who set fire to cars in the Parisian suburbs in 2005, say sociologists. "It is an effective way to attract a lot of attention to your dissatisfaction. It looks spectacular, as if there is a war raging," says criminologist Henk Ferwerda.

If another terrorist attack is committed, it will be done digitally. ICT professionals expect that information from governments, banks, hospitals and other large institutions will be sabotaged, the Telegraaf writes. This has emerged from a study by VNU Exhibitions. Computer and internet experts are not very confident in the government: nine in ten think that the government is failing to tackle cybercrime.

The front page of the Volkskrant shows a photograph of whistleblower Ad Bos and his wife in a camper. That is where he lives now that his assets have all gone to legal costs. Bos, previously employed by road construction company Koop Tjuchem, spoke out on television in 2001 about the corruption in the construction sector. Despite promises, politicians have done nothing to help him. "They don't like whistleblowers here in the Netherlands. They want to know everything, but once they know then its ‘off with his head'," says Bos.

The government information service RVD is outraged that a photograph of Princess Amalia appears on the website of paedophile association Martijn. The AD and nrc.next report this. The photo appears on the visitors' forum, with the caption: "Our royal family has produced a whole new generation of princes and princesses, and thank goodness!" The RVD wants the photo removed from the website as soon as possible.

[Copyright Expatica News + ANP 2007]

Subject: Dutch news

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