Morning newspapers – 24 September 2007

24th September 2007, Comments 0 comments

De Pers runs a striking front page this morning: a black background with in white letters the text: "Email from soldier X, Uruzgan, 21 September 2007." A letter from one of the 1,700 Dutch soldiers fighting in Uruzgan, which – the paper suggests – gives a more true to life picture of what is going on than the "reporting filtered by the Defence department." "The fighting that sometimes takes place here is not worth dying for," the soldier writes, whose identity De Pers protects. He also describes his frustr

De Pers runs a striking front page this morning: a black background with in white letters the text: "Email from soldier X, Uruzgan, 21 September 2007." A letter from one of the 1,700 Dutch soldiers fighting in Uruzgan, which – the paper suggests – gives a more true to life picture of what is going on than the "reporting filtered by the Defence department." "The fighting that sometimes takes place here is not worth dying for," the soldier writes, whose identity De Pers protects. He also describes his frustration "at the fact that we are no longer working on reconstruction."

NATO leadership is counting on the Netherlands to extend its mission in Uruzgan, de Telegraaf writes. This has emerged from comments by the Canadian top general Marquis Hainse, who has said that NATO's plans for the future are based on "a longer stay by both Dutch and Canadian troops." The cabinet still has to decide on whether to renew the mission.

A photograph of a sunny, car-free Rokin in Amsterdam graces the front page of the Volkskrant. The car-free Sunday provoked "strong irritation" in the capital, writes the Telegraaf, which reports on "traffic chaos on the edge of the city." "At the end of the warm day even the officers directing traffic were relieved that the event was over," the Telegraaf reports.

The fear of a terrorist attack in the Netherlands has diminished significantly, the AD writes. Tjibbe Joustra, the National Coordinator for Anti-terrorism, says that it is calmer here than in Germany or Denmark, for example, because a close eye is being kept on the group of people that pose a potential danger; the fact that terrorist suspects like Samir A. have been sentenced to harsh penalties also plays a role, he says. Joustra does say he is concerned about the tone that some prominent Dutch have taken towards Muslims. "Radical statements like that can be the straw that breaks the camel's back for people who are on the verge of becoming violent." Geert Wilders responds in the AD that Joustra's comments are "inappropriate."

More and more Polish workers who emigrate to the Netherlands are taking their children along. This is causing problems for primary schools in the municipality of Maasdriel, for instance, the Volkskrant reports. "They don't speak any Dutch and still have to attend school year," says alderman for education Gijsbert Smit. The financing for extra language instruction for these children is a problem: extra money is available for education and integration of children from Africa and Asia, but not for children from Eastern Europe.

[Copyright Expatica News + ANP 2007]

Subject: Dutch news

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