Morning newspapers – 24 October 2007

24th October 2007, Comments 0 comments

The Volkskrant and AD ask whether museums should install sprinkler systems. Just 1 percent of museums have these systems in place, the others fear possible water damage, the AD writes. This fear is based on lack of insight into how the sprinklers work, Rob Hartgerink of the Netherlands Organisation for Fire Safety says in the Volkskrant. He says there are many misconceptions that the sprinklers may erratically turn on and off. "A sprinkler really only responds to temperature."

The Volkskrant and AD ask whether museums should install sprinkler systems. Just 1 percent of museums have these systems in place, the others fear possible water damage, the AD writes. This fear is based on lack of insight into how the sprinklers work, Rob Hartgerink of the Netherlands Organisation for Fire Safety says in the Volkskrant. He says there are many misconceptions that the sprinklers may erratically turn on and off. "A sprinkler really only responds to temperature."

Patients are sometimes kept in hospital longer than necessary because there is not enough money for home care, the AD reports. Health insurance company Achmea feels the home care budgets it is given by the Dutch Healthcare Authority are insufficient and is therefore taking the matter to court in an attempt to get more money. The Healthcare Authority says that the healthcare offices need to be "smarter and more efficient."

Poles who come to work in the Netherlands are still often being exploited, Sp!ts reports. Illegal contractors lure workers to the Netherlands under false pretexts and put them to work for poor pay and house them in abominable conditions. "Poles are not always aware of their rights in the Netherlands," says Frank van Gool, director of the OTTO Work Force employment agency. Employers regularly confiscate Polish workers' identity papers to prevent them from leaving. This "modern slavery" mainly occurs in the agricultural sector, the paper reports.

Train and bus stations are the places where the Dutch feel the least safe. This has emerged from a survey by TNS Ncompass, De Pers writes. A large majority (81 percent) has no objection to camera surveillance in public spaces. The things people get most annoyed about in public spaces are vandalism and lack of respect, the survey says.

Petter Nylander, the director of online betting company Unibet who was arrested at Schiphol on Monday, was in the Netherlands for interviews with the Telegraaf and the Volkskrant. Nylander was arrested at the request of French authorities because his company allegedly has violated French betting legislation. Nylander says he would like to open a Unibet location in the Netherlands. "Within five years we'll have a company in the Netherlands as big as Heineken, for instance," he says.

[Copyright Expatica News + ANP 2007]

Subject: Dutch news

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