Morning newspapers – 23 November 2007

23rd November 2007, Comments 0 comments

Housing corporations are going to build fewer new homes because of the profit tax they have to pay starting in January. Sector organisation Aedes says that in the AD on Friday. New tenants will be the victim of the tax measure, the foundation says. "The corporations have to earn that back. They simply won't build homes or will charge much higher starting rents for new homes," says Aedes director Peter Boerefijn.

Housing corporations are going to build fewer new homes because of the profit tax they have to pay starting in January. Sector organisation Aedes says that in the AD on Friday. New tenants will be the victim of the tax measure, the foundation says. "The corporations have to earn that back. They simply won't build homes or will charge much higher starting rents for new homes," says Aedes director Peter Boerefijn.

The military mission in Uruzgan will almost certainly be extended by two years. The AD, Trouw and the GPD newspapers all report this. The only problem is the financing, says Trouw. The extra money cannot be found in the defence budget and must therefore come from the treasury, or from Minister Koenders' development aid budget.

People living in the Netherlands illegally often have to pay cash in hospitals before receiving treatment, the Volkskrant reports. Fees vary from EUR 100 to 300. The hospitals are in violation of the law by charging these fees, says the Dutch Health Authority. The policy is also reportedly in violation of international human rights treaties. There are more uninsured people since the introduction of the new healthcare system in 2006, the paper reports. This is costing the hospitals more money. The 150,000 to 250,000 illegal aliens who are unable to get insurance seem to be paying the price.

The SP wants to take tighter hold of the reins, the Volkskrant writes. The party is going to systematically train new members in the regions in the "political ABCs of the SP" before they are given responsibility within the party. "We want to be sure that everyone is going in the right direction," says party secretary Hans van Heijningen. There have been various problems with local SP leaders over the past months.

Cocaine is no longer the drug of the elite, Trouw writes in response to the news that cocaine use in Europe has increased over the past year. At the end of the 1970s and early 1980s the expensive drug was reserved for "yuppies, stock brokers, and artists," says researcher Ton Nabben. But the price has dropped from 150 to 175 guilders per gram to 50 euro. "Coke has become much more available to a wider public these days."

[Copyright Expatica News + ANP 2007]

Subject: Dutch news

0 Comments To This Article