Morning newspapers – 22 August 2007

22nd August 2007, Comments 0 comments

France and the European Commission want an EU-wide alert system set up to help solve child abduction cases. Trouw reports this. The system would make it possible to quickly alert the public via radio, television and internet, at train and bus stations and on motorways. Expert on missing person cases Carlo Schippers of the national police service KLPD supports calling on the public to help track down children, especially in cases where there are serious indications that sexual abuse may be the motive.

France and the European Commission want an EU-wide alert system set up to help solve child abduction cases. Trouw reports this. The system would make it possible to quickly alert the public via radio, television and internet, at train and bus stations and on motorways. Expert on missing person cases Carlo Schippers of the national police service KLPD supports calling on the public to help track down children, especially in cases where there are serious indications that sexual abuse may be the motive.

Parents should be stricter with children and spoil them less, parents say. This has emerged from a survey by J/M, the monthly magazine for parents with primary school children, according to the Volkskrant. Especially discipline at school should be harsher, says 89 percent of parents. Parents mainly get annoyed at other people's children, whom they say are "insolent, antisocial, sneaky and disobedient."

The percentage of racially motivated violence stemming from the extreme right rose by more than 75 percent last year compared to 2005. The Volkskrant reports on a study by the Monitor for Racism & Extremism. The increase is conspicuous in light of the fact that the total number of racially motivated violent incidents fell by 10 percent in 2006.

Teachers will soon be provided training to recognise radical tendencies among Muslim youth at an early stage. Municipalities will be given extra funding from the government for this, the AD reports. The cabinet will soon take a decision on the action plan. But the director of school district Melanchton in Rotterdam says his faculty will not be attending the course. "We are not going to spy on our students."

The Central Bureau for Driving Tests is itself to blame for the ridiculously long waiting times for driving tests, the AD reports. The works council says that management at the agency was warned. Against the advice of the works council, management decided to leave 20 job openings for examiners in 2005 and 2006 vacant in order to cut back on costs. "This seriously endangers the CBR's ability to do its job," works council chairman Cees Lange wrote on 16 April of this year.

Retail businesses are increasingly consulting a blacklist, a database of workers found to have committed fraud, while interviewing job applicants. Pieter Walraven, secretary of the Combating Fraud in Retail Foundation said this in the Telegraaf on Wednesday. "We have concluded that by mid 2007 the blacklist had already been consulted more frequently than in the whole of 2006." The foundation expects a decrease in the damage caused by fraud at the businesses affiliated with it.

[Copyright Expatica News + ANP 2007]

Subject: Dutch news

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