Morning newspapers – 19 November 2007

19th November 2007, Comments 0 comments

The jobs promised as a means of getting those with little prospect of finding a job back to work are not materialising, despite agreements in the coalition agreement and those made during the employment summit in June. "The cabinet is not responding," Leo Hartveld, director of union confederation FNV, says in Trouw. The unions think that these jobs should pay minimum wage, municipalities say this would make the jobs too expensive, for other employers as well.

The jobs promised as a means of getting those with little prospect of finding a job back to work are not materialising, despite agreements in the coalition agreement and those made during the employment summit in June. "The cabinet is not responding," Leo Hartveld, director of union confederation FNV, says in Trouw. The unions think that these jobs should pay minimum wage, municipalities say this would make the jobs too expensive, for other employers as well.

There is not enough assistance for victims of sexual abuse, DAG reports. The responsibility to provide assistance was handed over from national to local institutions in 2003, but the transition did not go smoothly. "Our work was not taken over," says Ellen Giepmans of support organisation Fiom.  "Some institutions were interested, but support for victims of sexual abuse was not a priority. Or there wasn't enough money." In setting budgets municipalities often give priority to institutions for aggressive youth, depression and bereavement counselling, DAG writes.

Higher penalties should be introduced for traffic offences. The Association for Traffic Victims is calling for this. Perpetrators of traffic offences often get away with a fine or community service sentence. "It must be much clearer what you are risking. The more serious the outcome of an accident, the harsher the penalty should be," chairman of the association Peter Elsenaar says in the AD.

It is the week of truth for Balkenende's fourth government, the Volkskrant writes. "The most thorny dossiers – dismissal legislation, teachers' salaries, top incomes, Uruzgan – are piling up, and time is of essence." The bickering over these issues is really just a power struggle within the coalition to determine who is really the boss in the cabinet, the Volkskrant says.

"If it goes wrong, Balkenende is responsible." Ayaan Hirsi Ali says this in an interview in De Pers on Monday. Much of the article talks about her security. The cabinet recently decided to stop paying for her protection abroad. Hirsi Ali says she is now being protected by a private company. "I have just set up a foundation and some people have already donated money. It is enough for the time being, but not inexhaustible."

[Copyright Expatica News + ANP 2007]

Subject: Dutch news

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