Morning newspapers – 18 September 2007

18th September 2007, Comments 0 comments

Nrc.next has a picture on the front page of 'My first briefcase,' a reference to the 'My first Sony' campaign from the 1980s. It is Finance Minister Wouter Bos' 'first briefcase,' the first budget he is presenting to the nation.

Nrc.next has a picture on the front page of 'My first briefcase,' a reference to the 'My first Sony' campaign from the 1980s. It is Finance Minister Wouter Bos' 'first briefcase,' the first budget he is presenting to the nation.

While the Telegraaf puts the emphasis on tax hikes, the Volkskrant writes that this budget will be Bos' chance to "get his own back." He managed to get many of the Labour PvdA's demands included in the budget. Concrete examples that Bos outlined in his Netspar lecture in April 2006: wealthy residents should enjoy less of a tax break on their homes, stay-at-home mothers should receive a fiscal bonus, and free child care should be available.

Trouw takes the occasion of Prinsjesdag to comment on the hats worn by female government members and others on this day, always a topic of much public interest. Trouw talks to milliner Irene Bussemaker – who says she hates Prinsjesdag. "My biggest problem with Prinsjesdag is that some people don't know how to wear hats properly. I sometimes get the impression that they don't take it all that seriously."

Car manufacturer Nedcar seems to have been rescued, the Telegraaf writes. Owner Mitsubishi wants to move the production of tens of thousands of SUVs a year from Japan to the plant in Born, Limburg, according to insiders. This will increase production from 70,000 to 100,000 units. The future of the plant was uncertain after the production of the Smart ForFour was terminated.

Car thieves have found a new way to sell their stolen cars, the AD reports, by making use of forged registration papers. They find a car on the street that is similar in colour, make and model to the stolen car and use this car's license plate number on the forged papers. This makes the car much easier to sell. The false papers are available on the internet for about EUR 1,500 and are practically indistinguishable from authentic documents.

The Volkskrant talked to Swedish cartoonist Lars Viks, who is in hiding because a price has been put on his head by Al-Qaeda after he depicted Mohammed as a dog in one of his cartoons. Viks says that Swedish Muslims were more moderate in their reactions. "It has turned out here in Sweden that democracy and Islam are compatible. Swedish Muslims know what freedom of expression and freedom and the press is."

[Copyright Expatica News + ANP 2007]

Subject: Dutch news

0 Comments To This Article