Morning newspapers - 17 October 2007

17th October 2007, Comments 0 comments

In the battle for Chora in Afghanistan in June most of the civilian casualties were caused by Dutch troops. This emerged from reports of the UN and an Afghan human rights commission, Trouw writes. The ministry of defence did not include these conclusions in a letter to parliament; by contrast the Taliban was said to be responsible for most of the civilian victims. ISAF general Dan McNeill had said earlier in a report that the Dutch troops in the battle at Chora had violated the laws of war.

In the battle for Chora in Afghanistan in June most of the civilian casualties were caused by Dutch troops. This emerged from reports of the UN and an Afghan human rights commission, Trouw writes. The ministry of defence did not include these conclusions in a letter to parliament; by contrast the Taliban was said to be responsible for most of the civilian victims. ISAF general Dan McNeill had said earlier in a report that the Dutch troops in the battle at Chora had violated the laws of war.


Weekly magazine the Nieuwe Revue also reports this week on "war crimes" that were allegedly committed by the Dutch troops in Afghanistan. The magazine cites researcher Ghulam Reza Ebrahimi of the human rights commission AIHCR, who said that the Dutch had admitted their mistakes. "When we visited Kamp Holland Task Force Uruzgan commander Van Griensven indirectly acknowledged his mistake and promised to determine the targets more accurately in the future."


Dutch top managers visited the Dutch troops in Uruzgan during the past few days, the Telegraaf writes. A delegation made up of among others, Bernard Wientjes, the chairman of the employers' organisation VNO-NCW and Elco Brinkman, chairman of the largest employers' organisation for the construction industry, was in Uruzgan to take stock of how the Dutch business sector could contribute to help build up Afghanistan. Brinkman primarily saw possibilities "in the area of agriculture".

A great many Amsterdam police officers want to clamp down on Moroccan youths who are causing problems, the Volkskrant writes. There is irritation among police officers about the strategy of "a low profile approach to low profile offences", allowing a group of youths on the August Allebéplein setting fire to a car on fire and smashing the windows of the police station on Monday night without the police interfering. Chairman Ahmed Marcouch of the Amsterdam district Slotervaart feels that this group of young people should be prosecuted. "At a certain moment you need to show your power and your authority."


Mortgage interest relief should be scrapped, as well as the imputed rental value and conveyance tax.  These are the recommendations of the VROM council, Het Finacieele Dagblad, the AD and the regional newspapers report. The government should also build more houses to prevent an acute shortage of housing. The current government is doing too little to tackle the tight housing market.


Crime costs the Dutch society EUR 20.2 billion annually, according to the calculations of the Economic Research Foundation, the Telegraaf writes. "And that is a conservative estimate," the researchers said. A single murder costs the community EUR 3.2 million, according to the study. This amount consists of the costs for prevention, insurance, damage. loss of production, medical costs, grievance, detective work, prosecution, trial and the execution of the penalty.


Soccer player Ismail Aissati no longer wants to play for Jong Oranje (the national junior soccer team) after manager Foppe de Haan had criticised him. "I’d rather now focus on PSV. I am not happy with this situation," he said in the Telegraaf. De Haan did not select him for the match against Estonia, because he had performed poorly against Norway. "I believe that these kinds of things should be discussed internally," Aissati said.


 
[Copyright Expatica News +ANP 2007]
Subject: Dutch news

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