Morning newspapers – 14 November 2007

14th November 2007, Comments 0 comments

There are at least 500 websites worldwide offering fake diplomas or university degrees for sale. A spokesperson for the Information Management Group (IBG) said this in Metro on Wednesday. The IBG started a project two years ago to chart out these so-called "diploma mills" that deal in forged diplomas. Karina Ahles of research bureau Een Streepje Voor says that the market for fake diplomas has grown with the rise of the internet. "The 500 sites are definitely just the tip of the iceberg."

There are at least 500 websites worldwide offering fake diplomas or university degrees for sale. A spokesperson for the Information Management Group (IBG) said this in Metro on Wednesday. The IBG started a project two years ago to chart out these so-called "diploma mills" that deal in forged diplomas. Karina Ahles of research bureau Een Streepje Voor says that the market for fake diplomas has grown with the rise of the internet. "The 500 sites are definitely just the tip of the iceberg."

State secretary for Transport Tineke Huizinga is having a tough time with the problems concerning the introduction of new taxi rates and the delays to the OV chip pass for public transport, DAG reports. These delays fit in with a trend that has been going on for years. "Strangely enough time and time again it is women politicians who are getting their fingers burnt at this problematic ministry that has long been seen as a real ‘men's department,' where just 29 percent of the civil servants are female." Still the leadership has been predominantly in the hands of women for more than 25 years. In an overview DAG sums up the problems that continue to plague the department.

Commuters who use busy roads prone to congestion should be rewarded when they opt to travel at non-peak times. This is a proposal that a number of organisations – including motorists' association ANWB, nature and environmental organisations, and municipalities – have submitted to Transport Minister Camiel Eurlings as an alternative to plans to introduce road pricing. The AD reports this.

"Dubious property owners cash in," is the headline in the GPD papers above an article on Dutch municipalities which are spending tens of millions of euro to buy up properties where criminal activities are known to take place. Paying off the owners of these premises benefits criminals. Amsterdam, Rotterdam, Enschede and Arnhem are all buying up buildings in problematic areas in an attempt to clean up these neighbourhoods. Buying the properties often seems to be the fastest way to stop the problem, a legal battle can take a long time. VVD MP Fred Teeven says buying up the properties should only be a "last resort."

[Copyright Expatica News + ANP 2007]

Subject: Dutch news

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