Morning newspapers - 11 September 2007

11th September 2007, Comments 0 comments

A photo of Ground Zero where the World Trade Center in New York once stood graces the front page of the AD today. Most of the other morning papers remembered the 11 September 2001 attacks, though not on the front page. Trouw says that the major players at the time - George Bush, Osama bin Laden, Rudy Giuliani, Donald Rumsfeld – have seen their reputations suffer since the event. The terrorist network Al-Qaeda has only become stronger however, says journalist Abdel Bari Atwan, the author of a book on Al-Qae

A photo of Ground Zero where the World Trade Center in New York once stood graces the front page of the AD today. Most of the other morning papers remembered the 11 September 2001 attacks, though not on the front page. Trouw says that the major players at the time - George Bush, Osama bin Laden, Rudy Giuliani, Donald Rumsfeld – have seen their reputations suffer since the event. The terrorist network Al-Qaeda has only become stronger however, says journalist Abdel Bari Atwan, the author of a book on Al-Qaeda.

General David Petraeus, who presented his report on Iraq on Monday, is prominently displayed on the front pages of nrc.next, the Volkskrant, Trouw, the Nederlands Dagblad and DAG. Petraeus is "the man who America is listening to now," according to nrc.next. Trouw reports on the progress the general sees in Iraq, the Volkskrant focuses on the fierce criticism to which the report was immediately subjected in the US.

The danger of the military mission in Uruzgan has prompted fewer young people to join the armed forces. This can be seen from the drop in enrolment for military-oriented courses at regional training centres, the AD reports. School students, often on their parents' advice, decide against a career at the defence department because of the chances of being sent to Uruzgan. Another explanation could be however that the recovering economy means that a great many more appealing jobs are available. "You choose the armed forces in times when it is important to have a guaranteed job."

De Pers gives a reconstruction of the past seven months in the life of Ehsan Jami, who presented his committee of ex Muslims on Tuesday. During this time he has become known and controversial. Jami says he is tired of the media attention, but is powerless to avoid talking to the press it seems. "I've just made an appointment with Trouw. I didn't really want to. But Vrij Nederland called for a reaction, HP/De Tijd and Elsevier are coming on Wednesday. So I can't say no to Trouw."

The Netherlands Railways NS has filed a claim for some tens of millions of euro in damages from the government because of the delay in construction of the high speed rail line. The NS says it has missed out on a great deal of income as a result, the Telegraaf reports. The damages claim could be even higher now that it looks as if the opening of the high speed line could be delayed even further.

[Copyright Expatica News + ANP 2007]

Subject: Dutch news

0 Comments To This Article