Morning newspapers – 10 September 2007

10th September 2007, Comments 0 comments

The AD reports that Taliban fighters in Afghanistan have advanced close to the Dutch camp. The paper reports that the Taliban is planning attacks on police posts around Deh Rawood, near Camp Hadrian, where 300 Dutch ISAF soldiers are stationed. The Dutch are helping to defend strategically critical points. "We aren't going to leave the people here in the lurch," says the leader of the combat units at Camp Hadrian.

The AD reports that Taliban fighters in Afghanistan have advanced close to the Dutch camp. The paper reports that the Taliban is planning attacks on police posts around Deh Rawood, near Camp Hadrian, where 300 Dutch ISAF soldiers are stationed. The Dutch are helping to defend strategically critical points. "We aren't going to leave the people here in the lurch," says the leader of the combat units at Camp Hadrian.

Tanja Nijmeijer, the Dutch woman who has joined the FARC guerrilla movement in Colombia, continues to cause a stir. Her picture can now be seen on t-shirts, the AD reports. "It is an ode to Tanja, our own Che Guevara, who fights for her ideals, however naïve people may think that is," says graphic designer Vos Broekema, who designed the T-shirt. He admits the t-shirt is "over the top." "But I hope it kick starts the discussion. Is she a terrorist? Is she a freedom fighter? Naïve?" The Volkskrant says there are another 21 young foreigners active in FARC.

The government should not aim to curb high salaries in the business sector, says Social Affairs Minister Donner in Trouw. "It would require the government to impose too many restrictions on liberty. You should not aim for that in today's society. If a footballer's salary may not exceed that of the prime minister, then that's the end of football." Finance Minister Wouter Bos recently urged for a salary cap for directors of large companies, but didn't mention footballers.

Ehsan Jami is on the front page of the nrc.next because of the presentation of his committee for ex-Muslims on Tuesday, not coincidentally on 11 September. Jami talks about his reaction to the 11 September attacks in 2001 at the time: "I was glad. 'They deserve it,' I told my friend. That friend didn't agree. But I felt myself to be a Muslim and the Americans were against Muslims." The debates that ensued changed his way of thinking, causing him to turn away from his faith. Jami also says that he wants to change the Labour PvdA from the inside out and has no plans to leave the party.

[Copyright Expatica News + ANP 2007]

Subject: Dutch news

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