Morning newspapers - 10 October 2007

10th October 2007, Comments 0 comments

Bram Zeegers possibly died from a dose of contaminated cocaine. This is the suspicion of the police, the Volkskrant writes. Zeegers would have used the cocaine together with his girlfriend, who phoned the police alarm number 112 on Monday night. In the Telegraaf " a shocked friend of the family" said that the former lawyer was not addicted to alcohol or drugs. "Bram was certainly not a regular user. Whether he never used cocaine at all I don’t know. But that he would have died of an overdose seems highly u

Bram Zeegers possibly died from a dose of contaminated cocaine. This is the suspicion of the police, the Volkskrant writes. Zeegers would have used the cocaine together with his girlfriend, who phoned the police alarm number 112 on Monday night. In the Telegraaf " a shocked friend of the family" said that the former lawyer was not addicted to alcohol or drugs. "Bram was certainly not a regular user. Whether he never used cocaine at all I don’t know. But that he would have died of an overdose seems highly unlikely to me. "


Zeegers’ death is prominent on the front pages of the newspapers; the Telegraaf puts the news most prominently on its front page . "Who still dares to be a witness? is the headline in the AD, while Trouw also comments that Zeegers’ death can scare off other witnesses in the case against Holleeder. Nrc.next writes that Zeegers was not afraid to die, but "afraid of ceasing to exist". This comment referred to the fact that Zeegers refused to join a witness protection programme in which he would have to adopt a new identity.


Health Minister Ad Klink is going to ban the sale of hallucinogenic mushrooms, the AD reports. With this measure the minister has complied with the wish of the majority in parliament. Earlier this year there had been a number of incidents involving tourists who had used magic mushrooms. A French girl under the influence of hallucinogenic mushrooms jumped from a bridge and died.


The Telegraaf reveals that Ayaan Hirsi Ali visited Poland a month ago and stayed with the former Minister of Defence Radek Sikorski for a couple of days. At his farm he taught her how to shoot with guns and pistols. Sikorski says it is a shame that the Netherlands no longer wants to pay for Hirsi Ali’s security. "This woman is an icon of the struggle against radical Islam. Her life is in danger. Poland would pay for such an important critic. She is an important public figure."


The performance of roughly 25 percent of the secondary schools in the four main cities is substandard. The AD concluded this on the basis of data from the Education Inspectorate that can be found on the internet. The Inspectorate argues that the schools are doing too little to raise the output of the students. The performance of schools in Rotterdam is the poorest; almost 30 percent of the schools there score unsatisfactory.


Sixty percent of job applicants exaggerate on their CVs and 25 percent are even lying. This emerged from a survey of detective agencies specialised in checking CVs, nrc next writes. Many employers turn a blind eye when applicants are being creative with the truth, the newspaper writes. Perhaps because the employers themselves are not always very honest in the job description either. Management journalist Geerhard Bolte, who wrote a handbook on how to apply for a job: "A vacancy won’t state that you can expect a dictatorial boss, believe me."


[Copyright Expatica News + ANP 2007]
Subject: Dutch news

 

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