Man faces 10 years for Terwindt kidnapping

1st June 2004, Comments 0 comments

1 June 2004, AMSTERDAM — The public prosecutor called on Arnhem Court on Tuesday to impose a 10-year jail sentence on a 38-year-old man accused of kidnapping 16-year-old Reinier Terwindt, the son of one of the wealthiest families in the Netherlands.

1 June 2004

AMSTERDAM — The public prosecutor called on Arnhem Court on Tuesday to impose a 10-year jail sentence on a 38-year-old man accused of kidnapping 16-year-old Reinier Terwindt, the son of one of the wealthiest families in the Netherlands.

The prosecutor said the suspect carefully planned the kidnapping with the intention of obtaining a EUR 10 million ransom from the boy's parents, news agency ANP reported.

The suspect — identified as a Dutch national J. G.  lives with his wife and four children on Rarotonga in the Cook Islands — allegedly ran into financial troubles after purchasing a holiday park on the tropical island.

According to the presiding judge, his financial troubles became so bad that he finally succumbed to a desperate act. He was allegedly busy with preparing the abduction from the start of 2003 and the plan increasingly became fixed in stone.

In September, G. travelled to the Netherlands and in an internet café he came across the Quote Top 500 list of the richest Dutch business people and families. He selected the names of various rich families.

After various preparations, he arrived at the Terwindt family home in the eastern city Nijmegen on 21 October and pretended to be a flower deliverer. Reinier was alone in the house.

The suspect then bound the 16-year-old boy by his hands and feet and placed him in the trunk of a car he had previously hired in the Belgian Ardennes region. He left a ransom note behind in the Terwindt family home.

Police put 450 officers from the Netherlands, Belgium, Germany and the US to work on the case.

The kidnapper left clues behind by maintaining contact with Reinier's mother via email and SMS.

The boy was eventually freed about four days later from the trunk of the car during an arranged appointment at a car park along the A2 motorway in South Limburg. The ransom money had been gathered ready for payment.

The case sparked uproar in the Netherlands over concerns that the Top 500 list could give ideas to kidnappers and criminals and lead to repeat incidents. The list contains financial and personal details about millionaires in the Netherlands.

The ruling in this case is scheduled for 15 June.

[Copyright Expatica News 2004]

Subject: Dutch news

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