Majority of workers commute between cities

13th September 2004, Comments 0 comments

13 September 2004 , AMSTERDAM — New figures from the Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS) have revealed that 51 percent of Dutch workers in 2001 travelled outside their home city for work, compared with just 15 percent in 1947.

13 September 2004

AMSTERDAM — New figures from the Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS) have revealed that 51 percent of Dutch workers in 2001 travelled outside their home city for work, compared with just 15 percent in 1947.

The 2001 census also indicated that greater Amsterdam is the most "emancipated" Dutch city with the largest amount of women with a full-time job. At the same time, it has the largest number of men with a part-time job.

In part due to the fierce opposition to the 1971 census, in which large numbers of people refused to fill in the questionnaires based on privacy concerns, the CBS has changed tactics, holding limited surveys in 1981 and 1991 before conducting a "secret" 2001 census.
 
Compiling the information in 2003, the CBS had sufficient information from computer databases and municipal administrations to conduct the census. Many of the details obtained had previously been saved digitally by various agencies.
 
Having acquired more and more experience with using data from various administrative registers in the past decade, the CBS has developed the Social Statistical Database (SSD). The SSD contains demographic and socio-economic statistical information on persons and households, for which council population registers form the backbone.
 
The survey found that at the start of 2001, a total of 16 million people were living in the Netherlands, 7.9 million males and 8.1 million females. Most people were living in private households, but more than 200,000 lived in institutions, such as healthcare or elderly homes.

The CBS said 18 percent of residents in the Netherlands are foreigners, who are defined as people who have at least one parent born overseas.

The census also discovered a new minority: people who live and work in the same city. Since 2001, some 51 percent work in a different municipality than the one in which they live, compared with 34 percent in 1971 and 15 percent in 1947.

Commuter routes have also increased in length. Men travel on average 30km to their work, while women travel 24km. The CBS also said 55 percent of men work outside their home city, compared with 46 percent of women, newspaper Het Parool reported.

Some two thirds of working couples with no children travel long distances for work, while 61 percent of single mothers and 49 percent of single fathers have a job in their home municipality.

Amsterdam tops the figures for the most incoming and outgoing daily commuters, with about 96,000 Amsterdam residents working outside the Dutch capital. Some 235,000 people travel into the city every morning.

The largest traffic jam still occurs on the motorway between Amsterdam and Almere, where 20,000 people leave each day to work in the capital. Almere remains short of work opportunities.

[Copyright Expatica News 2004]

Subject: Dutch news

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