Inquiry, no injuries in Rotterdam train crash

11th February 2005, Comments 0 comments

11 February 2005, AMSTERDAM — Two trains were derailed after colliding with each other near Rotterdam Central Station on Friday morning, but there were no initial reports of injuries, police said.

11 February 2005

AMSTERDAM — Two trains were derailed after colliding with each other near Rotterdam Central Station on Friday morning, but there were no initial reports of injuries, police said.

The accident occurred at about 7.15am. About 200 passengers on board the trains were able to walk back to the station, where they were given emergency assistance by rail operator NS.
 
"No one was hurt, but the material damage is considerable," an NS spokesman said.

The intercity train from Rotterdam to Utrecht collided with a local train travelling between Rotterdam and Gouda Goverwelle, newspaper De Telegraaf reported. The accident occurred near a track change 10 minutes after both trains departed from Rotterdam.

Both trains were traveling reasonably slowly at a place where trains may only travel at a maximum of 40kmh. It is not yet known the precise speed the trains were traveling at the time of the collision. 

The Traffic and Water Management Inspectorate and the Safety Investigation Council have both launched an investigation into the accident. It means that repair works to the track cannot start immediately, network authority ProRail said.

Fewer trains were travelling between Rotterdam Central and Rotterdam Alexander as a result of the collision on Friday. ProRail also said the disruptions will continue for a large part of the day and possibly all day.

Two trains collided at Amsterdam Central on 21 May last year resulting in 20 injuries. Inquiries later found one of the trains ran a red light, but the rail safety system was not triggered because the locomotive was travelling under 40kmh per hour.

A further 40 people were injured when an intercity train collided with a freight train near the Roosendaal Central Station on 30 September 2004. In that collision, both trains were also traveling at speeds less than 40kmh.

The automatic train warning system (ATB) is controversial because it is years old and currently does not stop a train if it is travelling below 40kmh when it runs a red light.

Transport Minister Karla Peijs promised last year to invest EUR 40 million in upgrading the rail safety system.

[Copyright Expatica News 2005]

Subject: Dutch news

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