Immigrant growth slows

30th August 2004, Comments 0 comments

30 August 2004 , AMSTERDAM — The number of non-western immigrants in the Netherlands grew substantially less last year in comparison with 2002, the Central Bureau of Statistics said on Monday.

30 August 2004

AMSTERDAM — The number of non-western immigrants in the Netherlands grew substantially less last year in comparison with 2002, the Central Bureau of Statistics said on Monday.

The number of non-western immigrants increased by 46,000 last year, some 19,000 less than in 2002. In comparison with 2000, the number of new arrivals is down by almost 30,000.

The Dutch government introduced tougher immigration laws in April 2001 and is currently in the midst of an ongoing crackdown on new arrivals. It is also forcing immigrants to integrate.

Meanwhile, the CBS also said the Dutch population grew by only 65,000 last year compared with 87,000 in 2002. The fall in population growth was due to the reduced number of non-western immigrants.

Despite this, the entry of non-western immigrants still represented the largest contribution to Dutch population growth, the CBS website said.

The native population grew by about 16,000 people last year and almost 4,000 western immigrants entered the country in 2003.
The Netherlands had 16.3 million residents as of 1 January 2004. That included 1.7 million non-western and 1.4 million western immigrants, news agency ANP reported.

The largest group of non-western immigrants is of Turkish origin. The Turkish population grew by 10,000 last year to 350,000. The increase was mainly second generation Turkish immigrant children born in the Netherlands.

Of note was the Antillean population, which increased by just 1,400 last year, compared with almost 10,000 in 2000. At the start of this year, there were 131,000 Antilleans and Arubans living in the Netherlands.

[Copyright Novum Nieuws 2004]

Subject: Dutch news + immigration

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