Hold on, the sun is coming

3rd August 2005, Comments 0 comments

3 August 2005, AMSTERDAM — While Southern Europe basked in hot and dry weather, the Netherlands continued to experience rain and cloudy conditions on Wednesday.

3 August 2005

AMSTERDAM — While Southern Europe basked in hot and dry weather, the Netherlands continued to experience rain and cloudy conditions on Wednesday.

But Dutch meteorological service KNMI came with some hopeful news for those who have not taken a summer vacation: there should be higher temperatures and less rain next week.

"The wind will die down, the chance of rain will fall below 50 percent and temperatures should remain just under 22 degrees," KNMI said.

How long the brighter weather will last and what the rest of August holds in store remains unclear. Month and season forecasting works well in other parts of the world but the technology does not achieve such reliable results for Western Europe, a KNMI spokesperson said.

Although wet and dull conditions in July provided little by the way of summer weather in the Netherlands, KNMI said the average temperature was on the warm side. The average temperature came to 17.7 degrees, 0.3 degrees hotter than the average in recent years.

The period 20 July to 20 August is in general the wettest and warmest part of the entire year. The period is known as the Hondsdagen, or Dog Days. The Dutch name it for the star Sirius of the constellation Canis Major (Great Dog). The star rises with the sun during this period and cannot be seen.

The Hondsdagen are characterised by moist and sultry weather with occasional heavy showers.

June has been the hottest month so far this year, with 10 'summer' and 18  'warm' days recorded by at the weather station at De Bilt. The Netherlands experienced a heatwave from 18 to 24 June. 

The highest recorded temperature was at the Gilze-Rijen airbase on 20 June when the mercury rose to 34.7 degrees.

[Copyright Expatica News + ANP 2005]

Subject: Dutch news

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