German-made euros overtake Dutch notes

24th August 2004, Comments 0 comments

24 August 2004 , AMSTERDAM — There have been a higher number of German-made euro currency notes circulating in the Netherlands in the last two months than Dutch-produced notes, figures indicated on Tuesday. The chance of coming across a German euro note is 39 percent, compared with 33 percent for a note printed in the Netherlands, Dutch daily newspaper De Volkskrant reported.

24 August 2004

AMSTERDAM — There have been a higher number of German-made euro currency notes circulating in the Netherlands in the last two months than Dutch-produced notes, figures indicated on Tuesday.
 
The chance of coming across a German euro note is 39 percent, compared with 33 percent for a note printed in the Netherlands, Dutch daily newspaper De Volkskrant reported.

The statistics were compiled by the website www.eurobilltracker.com, where about 33,000 volunteers worldwide submit a monthly report listing the origin of euro notes in their wallet or purse.

The origin of a euro note is identified by a letter found on the note itself. The letter P stands for the Netherlands and an X for Germany. Together they form about 75 percent of the euro notes circulating in the Netherlands.

French-made euro notes are identified by the letter U and are placed third, representing about 7 percent of notes in circulation in the Netherlands. Belgian notes (Z) are fourth, accounting for just under 7 percent.

The rarest note is the Luxembourg euro. Identified by the letter R, these notes are almost never encountered by the volunteer money watchers in the Netherlands.
 
Dutch-made euro notes have slowly disappeared across the borders. When the euro currency was introduced into circulation in January 2002, some 94.9 percent of notes in the Netherlands were Dutch-made.

In other European countries, foreign-made euro notes are also overtaking domestic-made notes, the newspaper reported.

[Copyright Expatica News 2004]

Subject: Dutch news

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