Friso 'could have retained rights to throne'

10th September 2004, Comments 0 comments

10 September 2004 , AMSTERDAM — Prince Johan Friso could have retained his rights to the throne and still marry his disgraced fiancee Mabel had he chosen to enter into a registered partnership rather than marriage, a Dutch legal expert has claimed. The Dutch Constitution states that a possible future monarch must gain permission from the Parliament to marry, after first asking the government. But the constitution says nothing about registered partnerships.

10 September 2004

AMSTERDAM — Prince Johan Friso could have retained his rights to the throne and still marry his disgraced fiancee Mabel had he chosen to enter into a registered partnership rather than marriage, a Dutch legal expert has claimed.
 
The Dutch Constitution states that a possible future monarch must gain permission from the Parliament to marry, after first asking the government. But the constitution says nothing about registered partnerships.

Lawyer H. Loonstein also writes in the Dutch Lawyers Magazine (Nederlands Juristenblad) this week that because children born from a couple in a registered partnership are considered legal heirs, Friso and Mabel's children could also have come into consideration for the throne.

Prince Friso and Mabel were forced to admit last year to Prime Minister Jan Peter Balkenende that they had withheld information on the full extent of Mabel's former relationship with drugs baron Klaas Bruinsma, who was shot and killed in Amsterdam in 1991.

As a result, Balkenende considered the matter a breach of trust and the Parliament was not asked to approve of their marriage. The then second-in-line Prince Friso lost his rights to the throne in marrying Mabel in Delft in April. He retained the title of Prince.

The legal expert said it would be advantageous to adjust the constitution as  Princess Amalia — the baby daughter of Crown Prince Willem-Alexander and Princess Maxima — approaches adulthood.

Loonstein said as it stands, the future queen of the Netherlands could easily slip through the loophole and enter into a registered partnership — which is legally the same as a marriage — with a so-called "undesirable", but still retain her rights to the throne.
 
[Copyright Expatica News 2004]

Subject: Dutch news

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