Freedom 'threat' in anti-terror plans

8th February 2005, Comments 0 comments

8 February 2005, AMSTERDAM — The three largest Dutch political parties have reacted with amazement to the resistance from small coalition government party Democrat D66 to new anti-terror plans.

8 February 2005

AMSTERDAM — The three largest Dutch political parties have reacted with amazement to the resistance from small coalition government party Democrat D66 to new anti-terror plans.

D66 parliamentary leader Boris Dittrich said the Cabinet's policy forcing radical Muslims suspected by the security service AIVD of terrorist activities to regularly report to police was too extreme. He said the plan broke down the border between security and freedom.

He has also raised concerns about plans to designate certain areas as permanent security risks, allowing the police to carry out random searches of all members of the public in the area. He is further opposed to a ban on the glorification of terrorism and will submit motions against the cabinet's plans.

But coalition parties the Christian Democrat CDA and Liberal VVD, plus main opposition party Labour PvdA, said it was strange that Dittrich was now suddenly opposed to the measures, news service NOS reported on Monday night.

"Dittrich was in favour on previous occasions," PvdA MP Aleid Wolfsen said, asserting that the government's anti-terror measures hardly contained new proposals but were instead the development of existing ideas.

Speaking at a party meeting in Middleburg, VVD parliamentary leader Jozias van Aartsen said obliging suspects to report to police was "a very good addition". He said tough measures needed to be taken against the violence committed by a small and "bloody dangerous" minority within the Islamic faith.
 
CDA leader Maxime Verhagen said the cabinet was only carrying out the instructions that Parliament issued after the murder of Theo van Gogh last November. "Dittrich also agreed with measures to disrupt the preparations for terrorist acts and to take action against mosques that spread nasty books," he said.

The D66 was backed up by green-left GroenLinks, but party leader Femke Halsema was also disappointed that the coalition party was not fighting the issue within the cabinet itself.

[Copyright Expatica News 2005]

Subject: Dutch news

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