Figures reveal extent of Monday blues

19th September 2005, Comments 0 comments

19 September 2005, AMSTERDAM — It is no secret that more workers call in sick on a Monday than on any other day of the week.

19 September 2005

AMSTERDAM — It is no secret that more workers call in sick on a Monday than on any other day of the week.

ArboNed, the second largest health and safety executive in the Netherlands, hopes it can put an end to unnecessary Monday absenteeism by starting a debate on the underlying problems.

Businesses in the Netherlands are obliged to be registered with a health advisor (Arbodienst) which monitors workplace safety and the health of employees. The arbodienst is notified when a company employee rings in sick.

To start a proper discussion about the issue, ArboNed released figures showing it receives an average of 9,000 notifications of sick employees on Mondays. The number of reports falls to 5,000 on Tuesday.

ArboNed spokeswoman Inge Weel told newspaper 'AD/Haagsche Courant' on Monday that there were several reasons for the higher number of reports on Monday.

She said many people fall ill at the weekend and Monday is the first opportunity to call in sick. A 'busy weekend' is another reason for many people to decide to stay at home at the start of the working week. "They just aren't fit and healthy on Monday," Weel said.

Another group just don't relish the prospect of another five days of work before the next weekend break. This applies mainly to employees who "aren't happy in their jobs," Weel said.

ArboNed hopes publicity about absenteeism on Mondays will have a braking effect on the phenomenon.

More employees also report back to work after an illness on a Monday than on any other day of the week but in nothing like the same proportion as the numbers ringing in sick, Weel said.

[Copyright Expatica News + ANP 2005]

Subject: Dutch news

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