Dutch women get into a sweat over parking

18th December 2003, Comments 0 comments

18 December 2003, AMSTERDAM — Almost 40 percent of Dutch women break into a sweat when parking a car in a tight spot. Perspiration levels reach a peak when there is a long line of cars waiting behind.

18 December 2003

AMSTERDAM — Almost 40 percent of Dutch women break into a sweat when parking a car in a tight spot. Perspiration levels reach a peak when there is a long line of cars waiting behind.

According to a new survey, only one and 10 male motorists suffer from damp armpits while engaged in the same manoeuvre.

Half of Dutch women suffer from unwanted perspiration while preparing the Christmas dinner for the rest of her family.

But that is not to say men stay cooler than women or engage in less important duties.

Males are particularly prone to break out in sweat on important occasions, such as a first date or while watching an exciting football match.

The survey also found that 75 percent of Dutch men think it is a worse offence to sweat during a tense situation than in warm weather.

And who would conduct a survey to "uncover" such vital information? A deodorant manufacturer of course.

The company, Rexona, quizzed a grand total of 340 Dutch people, ranging in age from 20 to 35, to unlock the sometimes not-so-secret, watery shame that is sweat, news agency Novum reported.

The biggest revelation was that 82 percent don't like it when they are made aware, through physical or olfactory contact, that other people are sweating in their presence, or at least when standing downwind of the offender.

But Rexona says on its website that we shouldn't be ashamed about sweating because "everyone perspires, it is normal and yes, essential", as it enables humans to regulate body temperature. It costs us, in general, about 1 litre of water daily. On average, men sweat about 50 percent more than women.

Rexona also points out that sweat is odourless, as is "waste material" that adhere to our bodies. But the chemical reaction between various types of this material gives rise to bacteria — the culprits responsible for B.O.

Old-style deodorants try to mask the body odour by a stronger and fresher smelling perfume. But the good people at Rexona have developed products that tackle the problem at source by preventing the bacteria establishing itself in warm and moist cavities, the company website claims.

[Expatica News 2003]

Subject: Dutch news

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