Dutch news in brief, 6 October 2005

6th October 2005, Comments 0 comments

Schools must provide day care, Primary schools in the Netherlands will be obliged to provide day care facilities before and after the day's classes, Finance Minister Gerrit Zalm said on Thursday. He was responding to demands in parliament that schools should offer day care services for pupils between 7.30am and 6.30pm on school days. The Cabinet has yet to work out the details of the system. Schools will be allowed to decide whether the day care is provided by parents, volunteers or professionals. The gove

Schools must provide day care

Primary schools in the Netherlands will be obliged to provide day care facilities before and after the day's classes, Finance Minister Gerrit Zalm said on Thursday. He was responding to demands in parliament that schools should offer day care services for pupils between 7.30am and 6.30pm on school days. The Cabinet has yet to work out the details of the system. Schools will be allowed to decide whether the day care is provided by parents, volunteers or professionals. The government has recently earmarked EUR 200 million to help cover the cost of day care services.

House prices rise

House prices rose slightly in the third quarter of the year, the estate agent's organisation NVM said on Thursday. In comparison with the second quarter, prices rose by 1 percent. The average price for a house in the third quarter of 2005 was EUR 228, 000, the NVM said.

First book on Hofstadgroep

The first book on the Hofstadgroep has been published. Author and terrorism expert Emerson Vermaat presented a copy of the book about the alleged homegrown Muslim terror group to the parents of filmmaker Theo van Gogh on Thursday. Mohammed B., the man who was jailed for killing Van Gogh, goes on trial in December charged with membership of the Hofstadgroep. The Dutch-language book is entitled 'Hofstadgroep' and describes the organisation as amateurish but dangerous.

Police look into grave mystery

Police launched an investigation on Thursday to establish why a hole, measuring one-and-a-half metres, was dug into a very old Jewish grave in the Dutch city of Roermond. It is unclear when exactly or why the hole was dug or whether anything was taken. The grave dates from the end of the 19th century and was owned by a local family. The incident occurred in a cemetery which is no longer used but is preserved as a monument.

Postcard arrives 47 years late

A postcard posted 47 years ago has arrived at its intended address, the Dutch postal services said Thursday. The card, still bearing the original stamp, was posted in Rotterdam to Annie van der Meulen in the town of Glanerbrug on the German border. It was sent by her cousin, who affixed the correct four cent postage stamp in the old guilder currency. When it arrived the card also bore a 39 cent stamp in the new euro currency and had been posted in The Hague.

[Copyright Expatica News + ANP 2005]

Subject: Dutch news

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