Dutch news in brief, 5 July 2005

5th July 2005, Comments 0 comments

Body part finds not linked, The human torso found in the Amsterdam-Rijn canal in June does not belong to the same person as the body parts found days later in water in the north of Amsterdam, according to a report by the Dutch Forensic Institute (NFI). Experts confirmed a head, two legs and part of an arm with hand attached found in the north of the capital on 20 June belong to the same man. The torso does not. No information has been released in relation to the identity of the victims.

Body part finds not linked

The human torso found in the Amsterdam-Rijn canal in June does not belong to the same person as the body parts found days later in water in the north of Amsterdam, according to a report by the Dutch Forensic Institute (NFI). Experts confirmed a head, two legs and part of an arm with hand attached found in the north of the capital on 20 June belong to the same man. The torso does not. No information has been released in relation to the identity of the victims.

Surgical unit shut by MRSA infection

One of the two surgical departments in the Groene Hart hospital in Gouda has been closed temporarily to new patients due to an outbreak of the 'hospital bug' MRSA. Everyone who had contact with the unit in recent weeks is being checked, a spokesperson said. On Monday, a hospital in Harderwijk revealed two patients had died when a total of 29 patients were infected with the bacteria Clostridium difficile. A patient died in the St. Jans Gasthuis in the Dutch town of Weert in June as a result of contracting MRSA elsewhere.

Free papers increase circulation

The free commuter newspapers 'Metro' and 'Sp!ts' continue to grow in readership, according to figures released by the Dutch media auditing institute HOI. The report covers the first three months of the year. It says 'Sp!ts' had a daily circulation of 400,784 in the first quarter compared with 383,947 in the same period last year. Metro saw its numbers jump 48,909 to 385,017. 'Metro's' Saturday edition had a circulation of 227,480 compared with 171,231 in 2004. The big dailies lost ground in recent months. 'De Telegraaf', the largest-selling newspaper in the Netherlands, suffered a drop of 22,710 copies to 709,745. Quality daily 'De Volkskrant' dropped 8,849 to 300,494 and evening paper 'NRC Handelsblad' lost just over 10,000 to end on 249,710. Rotterdam-based 'Het Algemeen Dagblad' had a circulation of 275,713, down 1,790 on the year before. Liberal Protestant daily 'Trouw' experienced a rise of 2,548 to 113,234.

Wind energy 'kills 50,000 birds' annually

The 1,700 wind turbines in the Netherlands kill an estimated 50,000 birds a year, according to a study carried out on behalf of energy company Nuon and a bird protection group. But researchers found big, modern turbines scarcely kill any more birds than the older and smaller models. The findings seem to contradict the belief that the bigger and faster blades of modern turbines - which produce five to 10 times the amount of electricity as older turbines - would kill more birds. Nuon also noted that traffic on Dutch roads kills an estimated two million birds a year.

Fuel prices increase

Market leader Shell increased the recommended price for car fuel on Tuesday. Euro unleaded and Super Plus became 2 cents more expensive and now stand at EUR 1.385 and EUR 1.439 respectively per litre. The price of diesel rose by 1,6 cents to EUR 1.065 per litre.

[Copyright Expatica News 2005]

Subject: Dutch news

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