Dutch news in brief, 25 January 2006

25th January 2006, Comments 0 comments

Fraud costs 7,000 jobs, Between 7,000 and 7,500 employees lose their jobs in the Netherlands each year due to fraudulent bankruptcies, according to a report drawn up by the Justice Ministry's WODC research division. The report, which was presented to parliament on Tuesday, indicated that evidence of fraud is found in a quarter of all bankruptcy filings. The average cost of a fraudulent bankruptcy is EUR 600,000.

Fraud costs 7,000 jobs

Between 7,000 and 7,500 employees lose their jobs in the Netherlands each year due to fraudulent bankruptcies, according to a report drawn up by the Justice Ministry's WODC research division. The report, which was presented to parliament on Tuesday, indicated that evidence of fraud is found in a quarter of all bankruptcy filings. The average cost of a fraudulent bankruptcy is EUR 600,000.

Dutch troops kill man in Afghanistan

Dutch commandos shot and killed an Afghan man during a gun battle at the weekend. The Ministry of Defence in The Hague said there were no casualties on the Dutch side. The incident flared up when a car drove at a Special Forces patrol in the south of the country.  The troops opened fire and killed the driver when he failed to heed warnings to stop. A large amount of weapons and drugs were discovered in the vehicle.

One in 10 get incorrect salary

One in 10 of the 3.5 million people working for small or medium-sized businesses will get an incorrect salary payment in January, the sector organisation MKB Nederland believes. The MKB said many payment system have not been adjusted to take account of the legal changes that came into force at the beginning of the year. "An error margin of 10 percent is normal in the event of major changes," Jurgen Warmerdam, the organisation's Fiscal Affairs secretary said in an interview with newspaper 'Algemeen Dagblad'. The errors must be corrected in February, or else the employer could face fines of up to EUR 1,100 a day.

Unsafe sex in south Limburg

Unsafe sex is more common in south Limburg than in the rest of the country, according to the finding of a large-scale study by the local health authority. This leads to a higher rate of sexually transmitted diseases in the area compared to the rest of the Netherlands. The report singled out males aged 15 to 30,and gay people in particular as at-risk groups.

80 kmh speed limit increases jams

The introduction of an 80 kmh speed limit on stretches of motorways around Amsterdam, Rotterdam, Utrecht and The Hague has led, on average, to more traffic jams, the traffic watch organisation VerkeersInformatieDienst said on Wednesday. Cutting the speed limit from 100 kmh to 80 kmh last November has improved the flow of traffic on the A10 ring at Amsterdam and the A20 in the direction of Gouda. But traffic congestion has increased sharply at Utrecht (A12) and The Hague (A12). The speed limit was cut around the big cities to limit the environmental impact of traffic on local residents.

[Copyright Expatica News + ANP 2006]

Subject: Dutch news

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