Dutch news in brief, 24 February 2005

24th February 2005, Comments 0 comments

Teen jailed for double murder, A Croatian man has been jailed for 15 years by a court in Amsterdam for a double murder in Hotel The Quentin in December 2002, news agency ANP reported. The defendant, identified only as D. A., claimed he took part in a robbery at the hotel, but was not involved in the murders of Fred Hoekstra and Gijs de Mol. His statement was rejected by the court.

Teen jailed for double murder

A Croatian man has been jailed for 15 years by a court in Amsterdam for a double murder in Hotel The Quentin in December 2002, news agency ANP reported. The defendant, identified only as D. A., claimed he took part in a robbery at the hotel, but was not involved in the murders of Fred Hoekstra and Gijs de Mol. His statement was rejected by the court.

23rd tsunami victim identified

The number of Dutch people killed in the Indian Ocean tsunami has risen to 23. The disaster identity team (RIT) said on Thursday the latest victim was identified in Thailand, where 21 of all Dutch victims have been identified. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs said on Thursday that another 15 Dutch are still missing and a further five people who might have been in the region are yet to be accounted for.

Kebab hygiene questioned

The hygiene standards at cafes where kebabs are sold have been called into question by Dutch consumer lobby group Consumentenbond. A study found good hygiene levels at a quarter of the 35 premises examined. Too much bacteria was found in the meat of kebabs sold at one in three of the cafes. The researchers for the Consumentenbond said the meat is often not warmed sufficiently on the split before slices are cut off and sold in the kebabs. Some of the kebabs tested were found to contain both raw and cooked meat.

Tourists to pay fines at home

People from EU states who receive traffic fines and other penalties in other European countries while on holiday will be allowed to pay the fine when they get home. EU justice ministers agreed on Thursday the measure will come into force next year. Rather than being a help to tourists who are caught running a red light, the move is designed to stop people escaping paying penalties incurred abroad, Planet Internet news reported. It will work like this: if a Dutch person commits a traffic offence in France, the police there will send a ticket to the Dutch authorities, who will collect the amount of the fine and keep the money.

[Copyright Expatica News 2005]

Subject: Dutch news

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