Dutch news in brief, 15 December 2004

15th December 2004, Comments 0 comments

Baby can't be named Jihad, The Moroccan consulate in the Netherlands has refused permission for a baby girl, born into a Dutch-Moroccan family in Amsterdam, to be given the name Jihad, which means holy war. The girl was born on 27 November in De Baarsjes district of the Dutch capital and a city council public servant accepted the registration of the name without question. But because the girl has dual nationality, the Moroccan consulate was also asked to give permission for the name. It refused. The counci

Baby can't be named Jihad

The Moroccan consulate in the Netherlands has refused permission for a baby girl, born into a Dutch-Moroccan family in Amsterdam, to be given the name Jihad, which means holy war. The girl was born on 27 November in De Baarsjes district of the Dutch capital and a city council public servant accepted the registration of the name without question. But because the girl has dual nationality, the Moroccan consulate was also asked to give permission for the name. It refused. The council has since sent a letter to the parents asking them to respond.

Minister regrets criticism of Hirsi Ali

Democrat D66 Economic Affairs Minister Laurens Jan Brinkhorst regrets his criticism of in-hiding MP Ayaan Hirsi Ali, Prime Minister Jan Peter Balkenende said on Tuesday. Brinkhorst had criticised Hirsi Ali for making the film "Submission", saying it was like lighting a cigarette in an ammunition depot. He said it did not add to a climate in which solutions to social tension were possible. But Balkenende said Brinkhorst now regrets his comments, made in the weekly Vrij Nederland. Hirsi Ali made the film Submission with Theo van Gogh shortly before his murder. The film criticises Islamic domestic violence and Hirsi Ali has since gone into hiding after she received death threats. Van Gogh was murdered in Amsterdam on 2 November.

No ID could cost you EUR 50

People who fail to show ID upon request can be fined EUR 50 starting from 1 January. The fine for teens aged 14 to 16 will be EUR 25, the public prosecutor confirmed on Wednesday. It will be compulsory from the start of the new year for everyone aged 14 and above to carry official identification in the Netherlands. The maximum fine is EUR 2,250, but simple cases will be fined much less. Until Wednesday, the exact amount was not known.

Amsterdam: a city of extremes

Amsterdam sparks the most positive and most negative reactions among the Dutch public, a survey of 1,000 people by the DSP-Groep has found. Questioned on their most and least favourite cities, the Dutch capital was named as the best city in the Netherlands, followed by Maastricht. Utrecht, Groningen and Rotterdam were also placed high on the "pro-list". But Amsterdam also topped the list of cities evoking the most negative reactions, followed by Rotterdam. The Hague, Utrecht and Eindhoven were also viewed in a negative light. Some 14.7 percent of respondents looked upon Amsterdam in a positive light, but in the list of negative reactions, 25 percent singled out Amsterdam. Important negative factors were crime and public safety, while social atmosphere, historic centre, greenery and shopping were important on the positive list.

[Copyright Expatica News 2004]

Subject: Dutch news

 

0 Comments To This Article