Dutch news in brief, 13 October 2005

13th October 2005, Comments 0 comments

Women feel unsafe at night, More than three quarters of women feel uneasy on the street at night, according to a survey of 400 Dutch women by magazine 'Cosmopolitan'. Of the 100 men asked for their opinions, 90 percent thought all women were bothered on the street by a man at one time or other. Interestingly, 37 percent of the women confirmed they had experienced this. The incidents rang from 'innocent' whistling to verbal violence, being followed and unwanted physical contact. Some 25 percent of the women

Women feel unsafe at night

More than three quarters of women feel uneasy on the street at night, according to a survey of 400 Dutch women by magazine 'Cosmopolitan'. Of the 100 men asked for their opinions, 90 percent thought all women were bothered on the street by a man at one time or other. Interestingly, 37 percent of the women confirmed they had experienced this. The incidents rang from 'innocent' whistling to verbal violence, being followed and unwanted physical contact. Some 25 percent of the women also said they have been bothered at work on one or more occasions.

Adults on the move

Dutch adults have been taking more exercise in recent years but the trend has not reached the younger generations, according to a study by research institute TNO. In response Sports Minister Clemence Ross said young people will have to take a "refresher course" to increase the amount of exercise they get and to cut obesity rates. According to the research 60 percent of adults get the required minimum of exercise - 30 minutes of movement five days a week or playing sports three times a week. The rate was 52 percent in 2002.

Bird struggling due to climate change

The Koolmees (Great Titmouse) is finding it difficult to cope with the increasingly warm climate in the Netherlands, according to an article in 'Science' magazine. the Titmouse is forced to breed earlier in the year because the warm weather brings out caterpillars earlier. The birds feed their young with the caterpillars. Experts are worried that the birds may not be able to keep up with the forced early breeding cycle.

More delays on the line

Passengers experienced an increase in delays on the Dutch rail network in the last quarter. Figures released by Dutch rail company NS show that 85.9 percent of its services ran on time in the last three months, compared with 87.9 percent in the same period a year ago. NS blamed the delays on major problems on the network, which is controlled by ProRail. Other delays were caused by defective trains.

Rotterdam allows government flights

Queen Beatrix and Prime Minister Jan Peter Balkenende can once more use Rotterdam Airport. The management decided to lift a temporary ban on government jets after a court ruled the airport does not have to pay a EUR 520,000 fine for breaching noise regulations. The airport said the excessive noise was caused by government jets.

Groningen suspends pigeon cull

Pigeons in the city of Groningen have been granted a temporary reprievel. The municipality announced on Thursday that a plan to catch and gas pigeons had been put on hold until the results a no-feeding policy are made known. The order not to feed the birds was introduced in August and was to be followed by a once-off action to catch and gas pigeons to keep the population under control.

[Copyright Expatica News + ANP 2005]

Subject: Dutch news

0 Comments To This Article