Dutch news in brief, 13 April 2006

13th April 2006, Comments 0 comments

Rotterdam gets Pim's archive, Pim Fortuyn's private papers are being presented to Rotterdam's municipal archive, the former secretary of the murdered politician said on Thursday. "The signatures still have to be placed, but that is only a formality," Baukje Schuling said. The collection includes boxes with letters from other politicians, friends and relatives and cuttings of Fortuyn's columns and articles.

Rotterdam gets Pim's archive

Pim Fortuyn's private papers are being presented to Rotterdam's municipal archive, the former secretary of the murdered politician said on Thursday. "The signatures still have to be placed, but that is only a formality," Baukje Schuling said. The collection includes boxes with letters from other politicians, friends and relatives and cuttings of Fortuyn's columns and articles.

Man arrested for poison snake joke

Police said on Thursday a man, 18, has admitted he hung posters around the Lewenborg district of Groningen on Sunday night falsely warning a Black Mamba snake was on the loose. The posters caused a lot of anxiety among local people. The instigator of the false report may be prosecuted. Named because of the black inside of its mouth and not its skin colour, the Black Mamba is the largest venomous snake native to Africa.

Labour opposes broadcasting reform

The Labour Party (PvdA) announced on Thursday it will oppose the major reform of public broadcasting proposed by Media Minister Medy van der Laan. Under her plans, public broadcasters will only be allowed to make programmes that contribute to public discourse and opinion-making. Entertainment programmes, for instance, would be left to commercial stations. The public channels will have to take their news and sports from national news service NOS. Labour leader Wouter Bos said the legislation goes too far and will lead to "fragmentation in place of cooperation" within public broadcasting. Bos said he thought his party could block the reforms as there are scheduled to come into force in 2008, a year after the next general election.

Companies ringing off toll-free numbers

More and more companies in the Netherlands are trading in their toll-free 0800 numbers for 0900 lines which callers have to pay for, the organisation for the business telecommunications sector (BTG) said. Prank calls and re-directs from joke lines, often by young people ringing the 0800 numbers on pre-paid mobiles, cost businesses millions every year.  Companies use 0800 numbers because they are customer friendly but calls from mobiles cost several euros, while the caller pays nothing. 

[Copyright Expatica News + ANP 2006]

Subject: Dutch news
 

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