Dutch news in brief, 12 September 2005

12th September 2005, Comments 0 comments

Burglars betrayed by children, A man and woman burglar team learned on Saturday that bringing the kids to work can cause problems. A 32-year-old resident in the northern town of Pieterburen discovered two children sitting in an unfamiliar car outside his house as he returned home on Saturday evening. He asked one of the children where his father was and the child replied he was burgling the house. The resident went inside and a man and woman ran off empty-handed.

Burglars betrayed by children

A man and woman burglar team learned on Saturday that bringing the kids to work can cause problems. A 32-year-old resident in the northern town of Pieterburen discovered two children sitting in an unfamiliar car outside his house as he returned home on Saturday evening. He asked one of the children where his father was and the child replied he was burgling the house. The resident went inside and a man and woman ran off empty-handed.

Amusement park shuts roller coaster

Amusement park 'de Efteling' in Kaatsheuvel has suspended the use of one of its star attractions, the Python roller coaster. A spokesperson said on Monday the ride is being inspected after one of the trains stalled on the tracks and rolled backward slightly on Saturday. The park's fire service had to remove the 28 passengers. The Python was opened in 1981 and is 750 metres long and 29 metres high.

Beer drinking going flat

Beer consumption in the Netherlands is steadily declining, according to statistics agency CBS. An average of 78 litres per person was drunk in 2004, compared with 80 litres the year before. This is an ongoing trend: in 1990 some 91 litres were drunk on average in the Netherlands. In contrast more wine is being drunk. The Dutch drank 14.5 litres per head of population 15 years ago and 20.6 litres last year.

Dutch working longer

Workers who reach 60 are choosing to postpone retirement for longer, the statistics agency CBS said on Monday. Some 22 percent of the people aged 60 or more who were still in employment in 2002 retired the following year. Three years ago, the percentage was 32 percent. Civil servants in particular are opting to work longer because of changes to their pension plans. Pension fund ABP pays out more to civil servants who continue to work when they reach 60.

[Copyright Expatica News 2005]

Subject: Dutch news

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