Dutch news in brief, 10 May 2006

10th May 2006, Comments 0 comments

15 calls over dead infant, Police received 15 calls from members of the public on Tuesday evening after a photograph of a dead infant was shown on crime-stoppers programme Opsporing Verzocht. The body of the unidentified newborn baby was found in Doetinchem on 29 January this year. The little boy was killed shortly after birth, a police spokesperson said.

15 calls over dead infant

Police received 15 calls from members of the public on Tuesday evening after a photograph of a dead infant was shown on crime-stoppers programme Opsporing Verzocht. The body of the unidentified newborn baby was found in Doetinchem on 29 January this year. The little boy was killed shortly after birth, a police spokesperson said.

Pechtold to run for D66 leadership

Reform Minister Alexander Pechtold announced on Wednesday he will be a candidate for the position of lijsttrekker (election leader) of the D66 party. There has been growing speculation Pechtold wanted to lead his party into the general election in 2007. His main opponent will be Lousewies van der Laan, the current chairman of the D66 parliamentary party. The winner of the internal D66 contest will be announced on 24 June.

Princess unwell at hospital opening

Princess Margriet, 63, became unwell on Wednesday morning as she arrived to open a new wing at the VU hospital in Amsterdam, RTL Nieuws reported. The younger sister of Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands was brought directly to the hospital's first aid department for a thorough examination. Doctors found no significant problem and she was allowed to go home. The government information service RVD declined to give any further details about the Princess Margriet's health. 

Trams prove expensive for Amsterdam

Continuing problems with the relatively new 'Combino' trams could cost  Amsterdam EUR 20 million, local gvoernment sources told broadcaster AT5. A special commission reported in 2005 that all the repair costs for the low floor trams would be borne by the manufacturer Siemens. But Amsterdam's Transport Authority GVB faces a bill estimated at EUR 20 million due to ongoing problems, but Siemens is refusing to cover the extra expense. Combino trams are in use in 15 cities around the world. In March 2004, Siemens admitted to problems concerning the stability of the car bodies and, as a precaution, the company instructed all public transportation services to take all Combinos with a mileage of more than 120,000 km out of service. Subsequently, hairline cracks were found in the joints of the aluminium bodies, which could cause the roof to collapse in case of an accident. Siemens says it has worked hard to address this issue.

Dutch bees sting less often

Bees in the Netherlands are becoming less prone to stinging, according to research by expert beekeeper Gerrit Frije. This is because the more aggressive native black bee is losing terrain to the more good-natured Buckfast and Carnica bees. Beekeepers hope this information will lessen the hostility to hives in urban areas.

Outrage as HP goes Dutch

HP Sauce, a staple of British tables for more than 100 years, according to the British Telegraph newspaper, may soon be made in the Netherlands. The media in the UK reported in horror that there is a proposal to close the HP factory in Aston Cross, Birmingham, and move production to the Heinz European Sauces Centre in the Dutch town of Elst. Over 120 British workers will lose their jobs if this happens. The Sun newspaper announced a campaign to keep production in the UK. "This is disgraceful. HP is part of Birmingham and the sauce is part of Britain’s heritage," Local Labour MP Khalid Mahmood told the tabloid.

[Copyright Expatica News + ANP 2006]

Subject: Dutch news

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